£20m cybersecurity programme to train teenagers set to launch in UK

£20 million cybersecurity programme to train teenagers set to launch in UK

A new £20 million cybersecurity programme to train teenagers will be launched in the UK this autumn, as part of the government’s plans to address the skills gap.

A new £20 million cybersecurity programme to train teenagers will be launched in the UK this autumn, as part of the government’s plans to address the skills gap.

Students are being encouraged to sign up to a new cybersecurity programme, as part of the UK government’s plans to defend and protect businesses.

The £20 million programme, due to launch in the UK this autumn, aims to train at least 5,700 14-18-year-olds by 2021.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS)’s Cyber Schools Programme will equip talented young minds with “cutting-edge cybersecurity skills”, and be taught alongside secondary school activities.

Matt Hancock, Minister of State for Digital and Culture, said: “We want the UK to be the best and the safest place to live and work online.

“I encourage all those with the aptitude, enthusiasm and passion for a cybersecurity career to register.”

A new website has been launched to inspire and encourage students to register their interest in the scheme.

It also provides information about the programme such as: “Some of the skills you will learn include digital forensics, defending web attacks, programming and cryptography. But don’t worry if you have no experience in these areas – the programme will lead you through them at your own pace and in a fun way.”

The programme will use “games, challenges and projects” to train its students, with “exciting opportunities” to learn about cybersecurity as a profession.

The website also asks parents, teachers and industry professionals to get in contact if they wish to help with mentoring, leading groups or providing industry insight.

The cybersecurity skills gap is a growing problem across the globe, with a predicted shortage of 1.8 million workers by 2022.

ESET’s Stephen Cobb laments that as many security experts approach their retirement, today’s students demonstrate a stronger interest in innovation rather than defense.

However, a recent study has shown that 37% of young adults are now more likely to consider a cybersecurity career than they were a year before.

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