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Research

Android banking malware in the wild

Recently, we’ve noted a steep rise in Android malware and predicted the rise in banking malware, now we see another example in the wild, this time SpyEye. Trusteer has a good rundown on it, saying “It seems that SpyEye distributors are catching up with the mobile market as they (finally) target the Android mobile platform.

The Dirt on Certs

Róbert Lipovský and I put our heads together and posted a joint article to SC Magazine's Cybercrime Corner on "Dead Certs?"

Should you hire a hacker to prevent data breaches?

With all the recent headlines about data breaches, should your organization hire a “thief to catch a thief?” That’s a question Kevin Mitnick, sitting near the top of the hacker hall-of-fame for famous hack sprees in decades past, has been contemplating. He’s not alone – many companies are wondering the same thing. There is a

The Induc Virus is back!

ESET has discovered a new version of the Delphi infector, Win32/Induc. Unlike its predecessors, however, this variant incorporates a seriously malicious payload and has acquired some extra file infection and self-replicative functionality. Two years ago, we published comprehensive information (here , here, and here) about the virus Win32/Induc.A, which infected Delphi files at compile-time. Though

The drones are here for your wireless

With fantastic teeny model helicopters sporting mini hacked Linux platforms that long to take over your wireless network and wreak havoc, or so recent headlines would suggest. Now, we’re big fans of innovation, and technology on the go, but these pseudo-drones (built on the cheap, for the under-budgeted aspirer of wireless world domination) lack the

Who’s responsible for your online data?

What happens after you share data online, and others re-share it, etc.? As data becomes increasingly inter-connected, with multiple parties touching the same data, Internet users are starting to wonder: who DOES have access to their data? Are they acting in your best interest? And who should be checking to make sure they do? The

9/11: More Scams Upcoming

...the latest crop of malicious web pages to go up includes hooks such as "Bin Laden alive", "in depth details about the terrorist attack", "police investigation results" and "towers going down",...

Back to School Qbot, now Digitally Signed

The authors of Win32/Qbot (a.k.a. Qakbot) are back with new variants of this infamous malware, and this time the binaries are digitally signed. Qbot is a multifunctional trojan that has had some significant impact in the past. It has also been around a while, with the first variants dating as far back as spring 2007,

Facebook bug bounty payout tops $40K

Facebook recently rolled out a program we thought was a good step, bounties paid to hackers to find and report bugs, rather than exploit them. So far that payout has totaled around $40,000, no small sum for the aspiring hackers, and probably a boon for Facebook’s efforts to proactively fix security issues before a potential

Responsible Disclosure and Fish Pedicure

Some of my favourite blog comments of the week: I’m surprised just how so many fish pedicure spas have sprung up in the uk without looking fully at the possible health risks to clients, or insuring against them. Yes, I've often thought the same thing, especially in the context of disclosure ethics and the issue

Android financial transactions on the rise – watch for malware

Awhile back we mused that the rapid rise in Android malware would hit its stride near the intersection of widespread mobile financial transaction use, and the continuing steep rise in adoption of the platform. Now we see AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon entering a joint venture to back a payment service for, guess what: Mobile financial

Win32/Delf.QCZ : Additional details

At the beginning of this month, my colleague Robert Lipovsky posted an article on a new threat called Win32/Delf.QCZ, also known as Trojan.Badlib or Trojan.Win32.Miner.h. This threat caught the attention of others and additional information has since been added by fellow researchers on the blogs of Kaspersky and Symantec as well as on the H-Online

Irene – is that you (or a fake)?

So you get a Twitter tweet or Facebook notification from what “seems to be” a friend saying they have the latest information in the development of Hurricane Irene, if you just “click here.” When you do, you find that your “friend” might really be computer script from a distant land directing you to a fake