Lysa Myers, Author at WeLiveSecurity - Page 3 of 4

Bio

Lysa Myers

Lysa Myers

Security Researcher

Education? 20 years helping – helping users, analyzing malware, talking with people implementing security technology, and testing security software.

Highlights of your career? Seeing the first few droplets before the Melissa virus storm hit, surviving the Worm Wars of 2004, my first presentation at VB in 2006, and having an article published in USA Today in 2013.

Position and history at ESET? Joined ESET: 2013. Current title: Security Researcher

What malware do you hate the most? The ExploreZip family – it overwrote files, thus destroying the data. Plenty of people lost a lot of work as a result of those outbreaks.

Favorite activities? Adventuring and whimsy-seeking.

What is your golden rule for cyberspace? An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

When did you get your first computer and what kind was it? 1981 Commodore VIC-20. And then I continued using a variety of early-80s technology until roughly 1993 (oof!).

Favorite computer game/activity? Checking my Twitter feed.

Articles by author

Patch Now – Adobe Vulnerabilities Under Attack

This has not been a great week for Adobe; they have been scrambling to fix a number of critical vulnerabilities in their Flash Player product that are being used in active attacks. But a patch is now available to cover all these vulnerabilities - so patch now!

Anthem breach: 5 defensive tips to take now

Yesterday the Anthem breach, the biggest healthcare-related breach to date was announced, as attackers accessed a database containing the records of current and former employees. As we discussed earlier this morning on We Live Security, this could affect as many as 80 million people.

Top 5 Scariest Zombie Botnets

An army of the undead, wreaking havoc on the Internet – it's a nightmare scenario that has played out many times as the population of humans online has exploded. Some zombie plagues have been particularly troubling, and we will take a look at the worst of the worst.

How to protect yourself after the Home Depot breach

Home Depot has issued a statement today that provides more details about their recent breach, as well as indicating that the malware used by the attackers has now been removed from their systems. This breach appears to be even larger than Target’s, as it exposed payment information for 56 million customers in their US and Canada locations.

How to protect your identity at school

Young people are targeted for data theft at 35 times the rate of adults – they are considered an easy target for both digital and physical theft. You can make going back to school an easier transition by ensuring your data and devices are secure both at school and at home.

Myths of the Target Breach

One of the realities of news that happens at Internet-speed is that it may not be wholly accurate. Much of what has come out about the Target breach contains factual errors that may not seem obvious, especially as they are repeated by many news outlets. So let us take a moment to examine some of the more common myths that have been flying around.

Why are so many kids still not receiving computer science education?

The city of Chicago recently announced a change to the curriculum for schools in their district that would introduce children as young as primary school to computer science concepts. It would also allow students to count computer science as a core subject that fulfills graduation requirements. What does this say about the current state of computer-related education?

How do we protect kids from online predators?

The Internet is a vast source of information for all of us, and naturally some people use that information for good, and some for ill, like grooming and stalking children. So what things can you as a parent, teacher, or other concerned adult do to protect kids against online predators and solicitation?

How can domestic violence survivors protect their privacy?

Domestic violence is not something that gets discussed much in information security circles, but there are few people that need advice on assuring their online safety more urgently than victims of stalking and domestic abuse. What can people do to protect themselves when there is a known and persistent threat?