Search results for: "zero trust"

Win32/Gataka banking Trojan – Detailed analysis

Win32/Gataka is an information-stealing banking Trojan that can read all of your web traffic and alter the balance displayed on your online banking page to hide fraudulent transfers. It exhibits a modular architecture similar to that of SpyEye, where plugins are required to achieve most of the malware functionality. In our previous blog post, we

Arizona DPS: hacked again – still – really?

On Wednesday we heard additional documents had been leaked from the Arizona Department of Public Safety (DPS). “Will this ever end?” has to be the most commonly-asked question in Arizona nowadays at the DPS. The original attacks last week were claimed by the group LulzSec, which was making the rounds exposing private information through hacking

Adobe Flash, The Spy in Your Computer – Part 1

Adobe Flash is, in my opinion, the most ubiquitous spyware in the world and no products detect it as such. The reason it goes undetected is that it also has numerous legitimate uses, however, there is growing evidence that indicates significant abuse. This will be the first in a series of blogs in which I

PDFs Exploitable?!? I’m shocked…

September 2009 saw some key security analysis raining directly onto the Adobe PDF platform, particularly with SANS pointing towards remote code execution within PDFs as one of the top threat vectors: Adobe Acrobat, Reader, and Flash Player Remote Code Execution Vulnerability (CVE-2009-1862) Adobe Reader Remote Code Execution Vulnerability (CVE-2009-1493) Kudos to Adobe for patching these

Ten Ways to Dodge Cyber‑Bullets (Part 9)

[Part 9 of an occasional series, updating a blog series I ran in early 2009 to reflect changes in the threat landscape. This series is now available as a white paper at http://www.eset.com/download/whitepapers.php.] Be Wireless, not Careless Don’t connect to just any “free Wi-Fi” access point: it might alter your DNS queries or be the “evil twin” of

Chinese Whispers: Targeted Malware and E‑Espionage

I’ve mentioned here before that targeted malware, often delivered by “spear phishing” carried by apparently “harmless” documents such as PDFs, .DOCs and spreadsheets rather than overt programs, can have much more impact than the raw numbers of such attacks suggest. In fact, some sources now use the term “whaling” rather than “spear phishing” to reflect the