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patch management

Windows Phone 8: Security Heaven or Hell?

Introduction Mobile World Congress 2012 is almost upon us, and one of the most hotly-anticipated topics is the next generation of Microsoft’s smartphone operating system Windows Phone 8, which has been kept under wraps far more tightly than its PC counterpart, Windows 8. While Microsoft was an early adopter in the creation of smartphones with

The more things change, the more they stay the same

It's something of a truism, that 'old viruses never die', and that certainly seems to be the case for some of the older, more widespread, email worms. In this interview (http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20041129/news_lz1b29five.html) back in 2004, I talked about an email worm called "Win32/Zafi.b" which, at the time, had recently been spreading on a global scale. However,

Hungary starving for security awareness?

My colleagues in Hungary have released some slightly alarming statistics about malware awareness in their part of the world. Research carried out on their behalf by NRC suggests that a significant proportion of Hungarian Internet users don't even know what AV software is installed on their computer (or, presumably, if anything is installed.) http://www.eset.hu/hirek/holgyek-tessek-vedekezni?back=%2Fhirek Out

Trojan in Microsoft Update Catalog – A Bunny Bites Back

UPDATE #1 Randy Abrams has posted a follow-up article, Anatomy of a Biting Bunny – The Infected Microsoft Catalog Update with additional information about how update services work, why they might distribute third-party code and what might be done to prevent malware from being distributed on services like Microsoft’s Windows Update in the future.  7-FEB-2011. Last week, we

Patchwork for the Home and the Enterprise

SC Magazine's Dan Raywood reports that "To be completely patched requires an average of between 51 and 86 actions per year", quoting findings by Secunia that " in order for the typical home user to stay fully patched, an average of 75 patches from 22 different vendors need to be installed, requiring the user to

Adobe, Javascript, and the CVE-2009-4324 Exploit

There has been quite a lot of traffic in the last few weeks about the doc.media.newPlayer vulnerability referenced in the CVE database as CVE-2009-4324. The following Adobe articles refer: http://www.adobe.com/support/security/advisories/apsa09-07.html http://blogs.adobe.com/psirt/2009/12/new_adobe_reader_and_acrobat_v.html http://blogs.adobe.com/psirt/2009/12/security_advisory_apsa09-07_up.html Today’s article at the Internet Storm Center by Bojan Zdrnja (http://isc.sans.org/diary.html?storyid=7867) gives a lot of detail on a particularly inventive exploit of the

Ten Ways to Dodge Cyber-Bullets (Part 2)

[Part 2 of an occasional series, updating a blog series I ran in early 2009 to reflect changes in the threat landscape. This series will also be available shortly as a white paper.] Catch the Patch Batch Keep applications and operating system components up-to-date with automated updates and patches, and by regularly reviewing the vendors’ product

September’s Global Threat Report

ESET released its Global Threat Report for the month of September, 2009, identifying the top ten threats seen during the month by ESET’s ThreatSense.Net™ cloud.  You can view the report here and, as always, the complete collection is available here in the Threat Trends section of our web site.  While the report identifies a number

Adobe Update Update (Update?)

This is a quick follow-up to the earlier blog about Adobe updates. I’ve just received notification that the Adobe Flash Player updates bulletin released yesterday has been updated: it now contains information about (and links to) the promised Adobe Reader and Acrobat patches. Adobe states that it categorizes these updates as critical and recommends that you

Statistical Accuracy and the Gullibility Gene

SC Magazine in the UK picked up on our Global Threat Report for June, based on statistics that derive from our ThreatSense.Net® threat-monitoring technology. Thanks, Dan: when you do as much writing as I do, it’s comforting to know that someone is reading it. ;-) I thought, though, I’d develop some thoughts on a topic arising

Targeted Malware and Microsoft

Microsoft issued an advisory last week – Microsoft Security Advisory (969136) “Vulnerability in Microsoft Office PowerPoint Could Allow Remote Code Execution” – that “could allow remote code execution if a user opens a specially crafted PowerPoint file.” The advisory uses very similar language to Microsoft’s recent advisory on an Excel vulnerability, referring to “only…limited and

Patches Despatches

In a previous blog relating to Acrobat vulnerabilities, I suggested that you might want to sign up for Adobe’s alerts service. I did, but still haven’t received any news from it. However, it appears that The Register (or one of its sources) did, so I’m nevertheless aware that Adobe has released updates to address the

PSST! It’s PFTS!

PSST! Anyone remember the Telephone party game, also known by various politically incorrect names like Chinese Whispers and Russian Scandal? A series of reports like this and this illustrate a textbook example of how rumour and misunderstanding (some of it probably wilful) can transform a story into something very different to its original form. According

MS09-002 Exploits: Old Dogs, New Tricks?

A few days ago, I promised (threatened) to make some general points about biasing test results, but travel and other obligations have been getting in the way. I’ll get back to that very shortly, but in the meantime, I want to look at an issue with the latest round of Microsoft patches that I was