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Botnet

BBC Botnet: Another View or Two

And still the controversy rages: several people have pointed out that it’s unlikely that the PCs in the BBC’s botnet are all in the UK, suggesting that there could be additional legal issues relating to other jurisdictions. The H reiterated the point that Ofcom regulations state that payment shouldn’t be made to “convicted or confessed

More on the BBC’s Botnet

Update: several nice, thoughtful blogs on the subject from John Graham at http://john-graham.me.uk/. International law firm Pinsent Mason’s Struan Robertson seems to agree (at least in part) with commentatory in the security industry that the BBC have broken the UK’s Computer Misuse Act. Robertson, focused on the Click program’s unauthorised access to 22,000 bot-compromised PCs in order to

Zombies Down Under

The estimable Graham Cluley’ drew my attention in his blog to the fact that this is National Zombie Awareness Week in Australia. A zombie is security geekspeak for a PC that has been infected by a bot or agent, so that it’s added to a network of compromised machines (a botnet) under the control of

Fast Flux Report: Situation Normal, All Fluxed Up

ICANN’s Fast Flux Working Group recently announced an Initial Report. In fact, it also offered a 20 day window for submitting comments on the report, but I missed that, as I was travelling and didn’t read that particular email. Perhaps you did better, in which case you probably won’t be much interested in this blog.

10 Ways to Protect Yourself: Part 5

Don’t trust unsolicited files or embedded links, even from friends. It’s easy to spoof email addresses, for instance, so that email appears to come from someone other than the real sender (who/which may in any case be a spam tool rather than a human being). Basic SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) doesn’t validate the sender’s

Fake Holiday eCards: Are You Surprised?

Yesterday, we started to receive reports of emails pretending to carry links to holiday cards.  These emails contain a link that points to a file named ecard.exe.  Of course, this executable is not a seasonal holiday card but malware.  The reason this wave of malware has attracted our attention is that it is very similar