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General

Free YouTube .mp3 converters – with a free malware bonus

Want to access the music tracks of YouTube.com videos on your iPod but don’t want to pay? You’re not alone. Recently, a crop of websites have popped up offering to convert the audio from videos to .mp3 files that you can then download at no charge. Sounds great, right? The catch: scammers are trying to

Scareware on the Piggy‑Back of ACAD/Medre.A

There are always people who want to piggy-back on the achievements of others. After ESET warned the public against ACAD/Medre.A in two blogs here and here  and issued a free standalone cleaner for remediation, there was always the possibility that drawing attention to the issue would result in the topic being misused for other purposes.

Cybercrime and the small business: Basic defensive measures

Evidence that criminals are targeting the computer systems of small businesses continues to mount. The Wall Street Journal recently drew attention to the way cybercriminals are sniffing out vulnerable firms. The article highlighted the fact that about 72% of the 855 data breaches world-wide last year that were analyzed in Verizon's Data Breach Investigation Report

Final DNSChanger warning

It’s here, folks! If the replaced DNSChanger servers don’t get another deadline extension, more than 500,000* computers may not be able to reach their configured DNS service after next Monday, July 9, 2012.  In other words, it will be practically impossible for the users of those computers to surf the Internet using human friendly domain

How much will your driverless car know about you (and who will it tell)?

Following the flurry of press coverage surrounding the proposed next generation of driverless cars, privacy groups are asking questions about what will happen to the data the cars (necessarily) collect, which – in the wrong hands – might prove tempting for abuse. Other car manufacturers plan on rolling out real-time data streams of information about

ACAD/Medre.A Technical Analysis

For the story behind the suspected industrial espionage, where ACAD/Medre.A was used, refer to Righard Zwienenberg's blog post. For technical details from analysing the worm's source code, read on. ACAD/Medre.A is a worm written in AutoLISP, a dialect of the LISP programming language used in AutoCAD. Whilst we classify it as a worm, due to

Your Facebook account will be terminated – again

If the scary email or app notification–and subsequent webpage–is to be believed, you have only a few days to verify your Facebook account or you’ll be out of luck. But don’t worry, a few days later you will magically get a few more days to verify, and so the scam goes. A Twitter follower with

LinkedIn security woes – and what to do about it

This morning when I logged into LinkedIn I was greeted with several front page references to the reported hacking of the site, and instructions for changing my password, which I did immediately. This is a good time to change all of your social media passwords, making sure you create a fresh password that is hard

You've Got (Nation State Hacked) Mail

We read in the New York Times that Google is rolling out a service that will attempt to alert users when it thinks their accounts might be subject to hacking by a government, hoping the user will take precautions after getting a notice that says “Warning: We believe state-sponsored attackers may be attempting to compromise

Stuxnet, Flamer, Flame, Whatever Name: There's just no good malware

A week ago the big malware news was the code known as Flame, Flamer, or sKyWIper (detected by ESET as Win32/Flamer.A), then on June 1, this news broke: "A damaging cyberattack against Iran’s nuclear program was the work of U.S. and Israeli experts and proceeded under the secret orders of President Obama." (Washington Post)  Clearly,

Press One if by LAN, Two if by Sea

At ESET, we spend a great deal of time researching the latest technologies and how they may be affected by frauds and scams. Sometimes these are “old fashioned” spam through email, or they may be programs like fake antivirus programs or ransomware. And we certainly have blogged extensively about PC support scams where the caller