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ESET Research

ESET Research

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Your Computer Won’t Protect You

You may have seen some headlines today about a New Java Trojan that attacks Macs. It turns out that it also attacks Windows and Linux users as well. The Trojan pretends to be a video on Facebook. A user gets a message asking “is this you in this video” with a link. Upon clicking the

I’ll Tell You How to Vote

A recent article at Time http://www.time.com/time/politics/article/0,8599,2025696,00.html details how an online voting system was hacked. The good news is that it was a public test and not a real election. The bad news is that real people’s information was able to be obtained. The “hackers” professor J. Alex Halderman and some of his graduate students from

Scam of the Day AKA She Loves You Yeah, Yeah, Yeah

What a touching email. Mercy saw my profile and wants to know more about me. She even tells me “please don't forget that distance or color does not mean any thing,but love matters a lot”. What a sweet sentiment. Now I’ll show you the email and I think you’ll see what’s wrong with this picture.

Picking Apps for Your Android

Sure, iPhones are a lot more stable than Androids, but there is one place that Android has it all over the iPhone… you get to know what resources an app can access before you install it. This capability, coupled with comments on apps can really help you make better decisions about what you install on

The 1 Gigabyte Screen Capture

Back in the early 1990’s I had a 386 with 4 megabytes of RAM and a very large 80 megabyte hard drive. That little 386 could do something an Android phone cannot natively do. I could do a screen capture and save it to a file. I thought that for some of my blogs on

Adobe Flash, The Spy in Your Computer – Part 4

This is the last segment in the series. To begin with, I have a question for you… What do you call a device that has a 1 gigahertz microprocessor, 512 megabytes of RAM, several gigabytes of solid state storage, runs programs, can be programmed, and can access the internet? Sound a bit like a Netbook,

Stuxnet Vulnerabilities for the Non‑Geek

Google translate is pretty cool, but they are missing a language. You can translate from Haitian Creole to Yiddish and from Galacian to Maltese, but you can’t translate from geekspeak to anything a regular person understands. The good part about this for me is that I have a job trying to do just that! David

Natl Research Council Says: Show Us The MONEY

Surprised to find annual cybercrime damage spread somewhere between 300 million and 54 BILLION? So is the Director of National Intelligence. Today Brian Krebs of the Washington Post and Krebsonsecurity.com detailed a strong push for mandatory disclosure of cyber intrusion to include account hijacking and online identity theft.

Teaching Your Computer to Lie

It was a tough choice to choose a title for this post. I also considered “It ain’t necessarily so” for a title. This blog is aimed at our less technical users, but perhaps more technical users will find it useful as a teaching aid as well. Today I am going to teach you how to

That’s One Small Step for Windows…

And a giant step for users! While working on a blog soon to follow this I discovered a behavior in Windows 7 that Microsoft has changed to make a small, but meaningful improvement in security. For decades the bane of IT professionals has been users who double click on anything they can. This has lead

Adobe Flash, The Spy in Your Computer – Part 3

In the first two parts (Part 1, Part 2) of this series I discussed some of the privacy issues associated with Flash and also explained the configuration options that Adobe offers. If you are willing to go through the hassle of creating an mms.cfg file and maintaining it then you really do have the ability

Stuxnet: Cyberwarfare’s Universal Adaptor?

Now that cyberwarfare is out of the bottle, will anyone agree to not use it? In the summer of 1945 in New Mexico, the Trinity test gave rise to the term ground zero. Could Stuxnet may be measured as a definitive ground zero in cyberwarfare comparable to Trinity? Concerning Stuxnet’s latest rise in China, David

Imitation is not always the sincerest form of flattery

Since its release in 2007, ESET Smart Security has received many accolades for its antimalware, antispam and firewall functions.  However, we have recently been the recipient of a very dubious honor; a rogue antivirus program which masquerades as our own software. The Rogues Gallery Rogue antivirus is a loose family of programs that claim to

Adobe Flash, The Spy in Your Computer – Part 2

In the first part of this blog I told you how to use the basic Flash configuration utility. This blog is for the techies. This time I’ll share with you how to shut the doors on Flash and only open them to the sites you want to trust. Very few people seem to know that

Adobe Flash, The Spy in Your Computer – Part 1

Adobe Flash is, in my opinion, the most ubiquitous spyware in the world and no products detect it as such. The reason it goes undetected is that it also has numerous legitimate uses, however, there is growing evidence that indicates significant abuse. This will be the first in a series of blogs in which I

Who Wants a Cyberwar?

The short answer is the media wants a cyberwar. Cyberwar is a dark, sexy, mysterious headline that sells and so each time something nefarious happens on the internet that potentially involves two or more countries, security experts are besieged with the question “Is this cyberwar”? Let’s look back to the 1989 book by Clifford Stoll

Tell Me Your Secrets

An Associated Press release http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100927/ap_on_hi_te/us_internet_wiretaps today indicates that the Obama administration is drafting legislation that would require companies to make it technically possible to intercept all electronic communications in the US. This would affect all of the US telephone companies, Skype, and also companies, such a RIM (Blackberry) that are based outside of the US.

Iran Admits Stuxnet Infected Its Nuclear Power Plant

While the defining research on the Stuxnet topic doesn’t go this far, Forbes writer Trevor Butterworth went out on a limb to name names along with detailing the warfare aspects: As I noted last week – and as the news media have only begun to grasp – Stuxnet represents  a conceptual change in the history

Don’t Leave Your Goalie Alone On The Field!

Last Month Microsoft released security Patch MS06-040 which patches a vulnerability that can allow a remote attacker to take control of your system. Some experts predicted that this vulnerability would lead to another worm like Blaster, which spread very quickly. Fortunately that has not yet happened, but the bad guys are busy working on ways

How Do You Test Anti‑Virus For Unknown Virus Detection?

Well, there’s a right way and a wrong way. Unfortunately ConsumerReports.org didn’t know of ESET’s NOD32 or the right way to test for unknown viruses either.  Here is what happened.  “To pit the software against novel threats not identified on signature lists, we created 5,500 new virus variants derived from six categories of known viruses,

Is a Mac more secure than a PC running Windows?

Recently an article (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/5150508.stm) quoted a security vendor as advising users to consider switching to Mac for better security. Are Macs inherently safer? The real answer is that there is no scientific data to support a claim that the Mac OS is a safer OS than Windows, and the truth is that it really is

Excel Zero‑Day Update

NOD32 now detects attempts to exploit the Excel vulnerability announced June 16th. This means that even if an attacker tries to use the exploit to download a virus or trojan that no product in the world detects, NOD32 will prevent the vulnerability from being exploited. No download means no threat to NOD32 users. NOD32 is

Excel Zero Day Exploit Reported…Have a (Win32)Bagle with it too

It’s been a busy day in anti-virus land. There is a reported zero-day vulnerability in Microsoft Excel. Currently the exploit of the vulnerability comes in email as an attached Excel spreadsheet. When a user opens the spreadsheet the vulnerability is exploited and malicious software is downloaded. So far the malicious downloads have been proactively detected

The Great Anti‑Virus Conspiracy

Working in the anti-virus industry requires a good stock of tin foil hats to hand out to some strange conspiracy theorists. The fact is that the anti-virus industry didn’t name a worm “Kama Sutra”, the media did. The AV industry didn’t name the worm “Blackworm”, that was a group (TISF BlackWorm task force) from a