Search results for: "stuxnet resources"

Added to Stuxnet resources page…

…an article by William Gibson (yes, that William Gibson) draws a connection between Brain (a 25-year-old PC virus) and Stuxnet. 25 Years of Digital Vandalism. He doesn't seem to think much of Stuxnet, drawing a much-to-the-point riposte from Bob McMillan: http://twitter.com/#!/bobmcmillan/status/30533396702699520. Links added to Stuxnet Information and Resources (3). David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP ESET

Added to Stuxnet resources page

Tony Dyhouse writes in SC Magazine about the political implications for the security community of the Stuxnet and Wikileaks incidents. The link has also been added to the Stuxnet resources post at /2011/01/03/stuxnet-information-and-resources/5731 on 14th January 2011.. David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP

Stuxnet Resources Update

Added to the resources blog at http://blog.eset.com/2011/01/03/stuxnet-information-and-resources: Report of a Stuxnet-unrelated vulnerability in SCADA software A speculative cyberwar link Some links on Iranian post-Stuxnet "cybermilitia" recruitment. http://www.itworld.com/security/133469/iran-responds-stuxnet-expanding-cyberwar-militia http://blogs.forbes.com/jeffreycarr/2011/01/12/irans-paramilitary-militia-is-recruiting-hackers/?boxes=financechannelforbes David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP

Stuxnet Information and Resources (1)

The Stuxnet analysis "Stuxnet Under the Microscope" ... has, unlike most ESET white papers, been subject to a number of revisions as we've come to know more about the malware itself, and as the purposes of its perpetrators have become clearer. However, since all the known vulnerabilities exploited by Stuxnet have now been patched, version 1.3x of the document is likely to be the last substantial revision.

Win32/Stuxnet: more news and resources

Perhaps you're getting as tired of this thing as I am (though with the information still coming in, I'm not going to be finished with this issue for a good while, I suspect).  But without wishing to hype, I figure it's worth adding links to some further resources. There's a very useful comment by Jake

White Papers Stuxnet Under the Microscope

Stuxnet Under the Microscope

Version 1.31 of a comprehensive analysis of the Stuxnet phenomenon, updated to add pointers to additional resources. This is probably the last update of the document, but further relevant resources will be added to a list here.

Stuxnet, Flamer, Flame, Whatever Name: There's just no good malware

A week ago the big malware news was the code known as Flame, Flamer, or sKyWIper (detected by ESET as Win32/Flamer.A), then on June 1, this news broke: "A damaging cyberattack against Iran’s nuclear program was the work of U.S. and Israeli experts and proceeded under the secret orders of President Obama." (Washington Post)  Clearly,

Stuxnet and the DHS

In fact, the real interest of the document lies in the extensive overview (12 closely-typed pages without graphics and such) of the DHS view of its own cybersecurity mission.

Stuxnet: Wired but Unplugged

I've stopped maintaining Stuxnet resource pages recently, but occasionally I come across an article that adds something useful to the mix, or simply summarizes aspects of the Stuxnet story neatly and accurately. Besides, its authors must be feeling a little left out with all that fuss about TDL4. ;-) A recent report in Wired gives

The Stuxnet Train Rolls On…

… albeit more slowly than previously. Added to the resources page at http://blog.eset.com/2011/01/23/stuxnet-information-and-resources-3 today: A nice article by Mark Russinovich on Analyzing a Stuxnet Infection with the Sysinternals Tools, Part 1. Though I don't think Stuxnet is universally acknowledged as the most sophisticated malware ever. See, for instance, http://gcn.com/articles/2011/01/18/black-hat-stuxnet-not-superworm.aspx. (Hat tip to Security Garden for the pointer.)

Stuxnet, SCADA and malware

Kelly Jackson Higgins in a Dark Reading article tells us that Malware Attacks Decline In SCADA, Industrial Control Systems, quoting a report published by the Security Incidents Organization drawing on its Repository of Industrial Security Incidents (RISI) database. One aspect that’s attracted attention on specialist lists is the mention of a large US power company