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Win32/Stuxnet

MS10-092 and Stuxnet

…among the 17 security bulletins just released by Microsoft on Patch Tuesday, MS10-092 addresses the Task Scheduler vulnerability prominently exploited by Win32/Stuxnet…

Stuxnet Under the Microscope: Revision 1.11

Tip of the hat to Bruce Dang and Dave Aitel for flagging an inaccuracy in ESET's Stuxnet report. And, indirectly, leading us to a blip in some PoC code which now looks even more interesting. (But that isn't going public yet.) The paper has been updated to remove the offending item. David Harley CITP FBCS

Who Wants a Cyberwar?

The short answer is the media wants a cyberwar. Cyberwar is a dark, sexy, mysterious headline that sells and so each time something nefarious happens on the internet that potentially involves two or more countries, security experts are besieged with the question “Is this cyberwar”? Let’s look back to the 1989 book by Clifford Stoll

Save your work! Microsoft Releases Critical Security Patch

As expected, Microsoft has released a critical out-of-band patch for the LNK shortcut file vulnerability which received attention last month. As a critical patch, this update will be delivered through Windows’ Automatic Update service, as well as being directly available for download from Microsoft’s site without a Windows Genuine Advantage check. A reboot is required for the

More LNK exploiting malware, by Jove!*

Pierre-Marc and I reported a few days ago that we were seeing both new malware and older families starting to incorporate the same .LNK exploit used by Win32/Stuxnet. We also predicted that “…more malware operators will start using this exploit code in order to infect host systems and increase their revenues.” Well, that was a pretty safe bet.

A few facts about Win32/Stuxnet & CVE-2010-2568

We realize there have been a lot of articles in the blog now about the Win32/Stuxnet malware and its new vector for spreading, but when vulnerabilities emerge that can be widely exploited, it is important to share information so that people can protect themselves from the threat. Detection for Win32/Stuxnet and the shortcut (LNK) files

Why Steal Digital Certificates?

When you read about Stuxnet and that it used stolen digital certificates from Realtek and JMicron to sign the worm, you may have wondered what the significance of that is or why they did that. There are actually a couple of factors to consider. When you try to install certain types of software on Windows

New malicious LNKs: here we go…

These new families represent a major transition: Win32/Stuxnet demonstrates a number of novel and interesting features apart from the original 0-day LNK vulnerability, such as its association with the targeting of Siemens control software on SCADA sites and the use of stolen digital certificates, However, the new malware we’re seeing is far less sophisticated, and suggests bottom feeders seizing on techniques developed by others. Peter Kosinar comments:

It Wasn’t an Army

As I mentioned in a previous blog, Wired Magazine reported it would take a Nation State to pull off a takedown of the electric grid. Actually, Mother Nature, back hoes, and potentially a worm have had major impacts in the past, but the recent use of the LNK file vulnerability shows it doesn’t take the

Win32/Stuxnet Signed Binaries

On July 17th, ESET identified a new malicious file related to the Win32/Stuxnet worm. This new driver is a significant discovery because the file was signed with a certificate from a company called "JMicron Technology Corp".  This is different from the previous drivers which were signed with the certificate from Realtek Semiconductor Corp.  It is

Which Army Attacked the Power Grids?

The hot news http://blog.eset.com/2010/07/17/windows-shellshocked-or-why-win32stuxnet-sux is of a zero-day vulnerability that has been used to attack SCADA systems. This comes hot on the heels of an article on the Wired web site titled “Hacking the Electric Grid – You and What Army” http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/07/hacking-the-electric-grid-you-and-what-army/. So clearly Wired had already predicted the origins, at least vaguely, of Win32/Stuxnet.

(Windows) Shellshocked, Or Why Win32/Stuxnet Sux…

…But that doesn’t mean that this particular attack is going to vanish any time soon, AV detection notwithstanding. Now that particular vulnerability is known, it’s certainly going to be exploited by other parties, at least until Microsoft produce an effective fix for it, and it will affect some end users long after that…

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