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The H

Stuxnet and the DHS

In fact, the real interest of the document lies in the extensive overview (12 closely-typed pages without graphics and such) of the DHS view of its own cybersecurity mission.

The Terrifying Android

At a time when Gartner estimates that we’ll have downloaded 17.7 billion + mobile apps worldwide by the end of this year, I couldn’t help thinking that Android users are likelier to pay for lax screening in the Android Market than users who are protected by reasonably strict application whitelisting.

Well, it looks like that concern had some justification. There are a spate of stories today about >50 applications pulled from the Android Market

Stuxnet the Inscrutable

This is an item you may not have seen amid all the speculation about Stuxnet, Iran and Israel.

Win32/Stuxnet: more news and resources

Perhaps you're getting as tired of this thing as I am (though with the information still coming in, I'm not going to be finished with this issue for a good while, I suspect).  But without wishing to hype, I figure it's worth adding links to some further resources. There's a very useful comment by Jake

iPhone Through the Looking Glass

…iPhones are, under limited circumstances, willing to share information with other devices when they shouldn’t…

Google Hack: No Comment

UPDATE: Kurt Wismer has just reminded me of a very apposite blog he posted in 2007: http://anti-virus-rants.blogspot.com/search/label/single%20sign-on.] A little more information further to my earlier blog. The H (Heise) gives us a number of links to its earlier stories about the Google compromise and tells us that Google have declined to comment on the New

Java 0-Day: who’s brewing the coffee?

Further to Pierre-Marc's blog yesterday about in-the-wild exploitation of the Java Development Kit vulnerability publicised by Tavis Ormandy, David Kennedy has brought to our attention a comprehensive article on the same topic published yesterday by FireEye's Atif Mushtaq.  You may remember that Atif exchanged thoughts and info with us a while ago in relation to

iWorm ikee: Sex and Drugs and Rick and Roll

The iPhone, it seems, is under siege: a recent worm exploits a known (and previously exploited) vulnerability that affects the owners of "jailbroken" phones on which OpenSSH has been installed. (Jailbreaking allows iPhone users to install and use unapproved applications.) Of course, there's been an enormous amount of media coverage on this already (I've just

Truth, Fiction and HTTPS

Update, 19th October. I was recently contacted indirectly by Eddy Nigg of StartCom, who points out, quite rightly, that this issue is not specific to StartCom, nor a problem created by StartCom. He commented further in a comment to Dan Raywood’s article for SC Magazine arising from this blog entry, and I think it’s only

BBC Botnet: Another View or Two

And still the controversy rages: several people have pointed out that it’s unlikely that the PCs in the BBC’s botnet are all in the UK, suggesting that there could be additional legal issues relating to other jurisdictions. The H reiterated the point that Ofcom regulations state that payment shouldn’t be made to "convicted or confessed

False Positive Fracas

False positives. Every anti-malware vendor’s worst nightmare. The European publisher Heise, apparently recently reinvented as The H, has pointed out that both GData and Bitdefender were inaccurately flagging winlogon.exe as Trojan.Generic.1423603. In case you were wondering, this doesn’t mean the whole anti-malware industry has gone mad: GData’s product uses two engines, one of which is 

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28 Jul 2011
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