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Stuxnet

Needles and haystacks – the art of threat attribution

ESET researchers explain the difficulties in attribution of targeted attacks; evidence is often circumstantial and the source never positively identified.

Malware and Medical Devices: hospitals really are unhealthy places…

Mass murder by pacemaker hacking isn’t the likeliest scenario, but clinical tools and SCADA devices still deserve serious security scrutiny.

FinSpy and FinFisher spy on you via your cellphone and PC, for good or evil?

We read that “FinFisher spyware made by U.K.-based Gamma Group can take control of a range of mobile devices, including Apple Inc.’s iPhone and Research in Motion Ltd.’s BlackBerry…”, at the opening of a Bloomberg article that several readers of the ESET blog sent us yesterday, along with a number of questions that boil down

Interconnection of Gauss with Stuxnet, Duqu & Flame

Last week, reports of a new malware named Gauss emerged, a complex threat that has attracted a lot of media attention due to its links to Stuxnet and Flame and its geographical distribution.  Since ESET has added detection for this threat, we are seeing geographical distribution of detection reports similar to those detailed by Kaspersky.

Stuxnet, Flamer, Flame, Whatever Name: There's just no good malware

A week ago the big malware news was the code known as Flame, Flamer, or sKyWIper (detected by ESET as Win32/Flamer.A), then on June 1, this news broke: "A damaging cyberattack against Iran’s nuclear program was the work of U.S. and Israeli experts and proceeded under the secret orders of President Obama." (Washington Post)  Clearly,

Win32/Flamer: the 21st Century Whale

Despite the confusion and the stampede to claim detection ownership, W32/Flamer is more than a media sensation.

Stuxnet and the DHS

In fact, the real interest of the document lies in the extensive overview (12 closely-typed pages without graphics and such) of the DHS view of its own cybersecurity mission.

Stuxnet: Wired but Unplugged

I've stopped maintaining Stuxnet resource pages recently, but occasionally I come across an article that adds something useful to the mix, or simply summarizes aspects of the Stuxnet story neatly and accurately. Besides, its authors must be feeling a little left out with all that fuss about TDL4. ;-) A recent report in Wired gives

SCADA still scary

“Infrastructure Attacks: The Next Generation?” now includes the speaker notes, which hopefully makes it more interesting and useful.

The Next Stuxnet

…the ‘next Stuxnet’ probably won’t be any such thing, whatever we may choose to call it…

The Stuxnet Train Rolls On…

… albeit more slowly than previously. Added to the resources page at http://blog.eset.com/2011/01/23/stuxnet-information-and-resources-3 today: A nice article by Mark Russinovich on Analyzing a Stuxnet Infection with the Sysinternals Tools, Part 1. Though I don't think Stuxnet is universally acknowledged as the most sophisticated malware ever. See, for instance, http://gcn.com/articles/2011/01/18/black-hat-stuxnet-not-superworm.aspx. (Hat tip to Security Garden for the pointer.)

Stuxnet, SCADA and malware

Kelly Jackson Higgins in a Dark Reading article tells us that Malware Attacks Decline In SCADA, Industrial Control Systems, quoting a report published by the Security Incidents Organization drawing on its Repository of Industrial Security Incidents (RISI) database. One aspect that’s attracted attention on specialist lists is the mention of a large US power company

Langner, Stuxnet, US and Israel.

Added to the Stuxnet resources page at http://blog.eset.com/2011/01/23/stuxnet-information-and-resources-3 on 4th March 2011: Ralph Langner at the TED Conference, as summarized by the BBC: US and Israel were behind Stuxnet claims researcher. As previously mentioned at http://blog.eset.com/2011/03/03/nice-stuxnet-commentary-and-hype-deflation. (Hat tip to Mikko Hypponen. Again!) David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP ESET Senior Research Fellow

Nice Stuxnet Commentary and Hype Deflation

Some extra resources: J. Oquendo takes a cold, clear look on Infosec Island at some of the hype that surrounds the Stuxnet story: Cyberterrorism – As Seen On TV While Visible Risk, while by no means entirely negative about the Vanity Fair Stuxnet story (see http://blog.eset.com/2011/03/02/more-on-stuxnet), makes an entirely reasonable point about Irresponsible Sensationalism. I

February ThreatSense Report

The February ThreatSense Report is now available…

More on Stuxnet

A few more developments in the Never-Ending Story: Michael Joseph Gross on A Declaration of Cyber War in Vanity Fair. Despite a somewhat breathless tone in the introduction – "the world’s top software-security experts were panicked by the discovery of a drone-like computer virus" (where's my Valium?!) – actually a comprehensive and largely accurate account. It

Stuxnet Resources

Links added today to the Stuxnet resources page…

Stuxnet, Iran and Anonymous

Links to two Stuxnet-related stories have been added to the resources page at /2011/01/23/stuxnet-information-and-resources-3/. Kim Zetter, in Wired's "Threat Level" column Report: Stuxnet Hit 5 Gateway Targets on Its Way to Iranian Plant, summarizes the latest update to Symantec's Threat Dossier. Symantec researchers now believe that Stuxnet targeted five organizations in Iran as staging posts

Another Stuxnet Resources Update

…the conclusion does support what does appear to be the official Iranian line that this was an attack against Iranian nuclear operations, but that it wasn’t successful…

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