tag
scareware

Scareware: It’s back, and now it’s even scarier

‘Scareware’ – fake antivirus programs which attempt to fool the user into downloading malware, by warning him or her of a “threat” on their PC – is back, with a new, even more annoying trick.

Ransomware 101: FAQ for computer users and smartphone owners

Do you know what ransomware is? Do you know a filecoder from a lockscreen?

Read our FAQ to become more clued-up about the ransomware threat, and ensure that your systems are properly protected.

Support Scams: we don’t really write all the viruses…

…and nor are we responsible for fake AV/scareware and (more recently) ransomware, though I did suggest in a paper I presented at EICAR a couple of years ago that the bad guys who do peddle that stuff are all too proficient at stealing our clothes, and that maybe some security companies were making it easier

Potentially Unwanted Applications White Paper Updated

Our white paper on Potentially Unwanted Applications (PUAs) has been revised with additional information, including information about how legitimate software can become classified as a PUA due to its misuse, a discussion of a type of downloader called a software wrapper and updated screen shots. It can be found in the White Papers section  Problematic,

Virus Bulletin 2011: Fake but free…

ESET had quite a strong representation at Virus Bulletin this year in Barcelona, as David Harley mentioned in his post prior to the conference. On the first day, Pierre-Marc Bureau presented his findings about the Kelihos botnet, David Harley and AVG’s Larry Bridwell discussed the usefulness and present state of AV testing, and to finish

Blaming the Victim…

So who’s to blame? First and foremost, the victimizers. Well, persistent victims, yes. And anyone in the security industry who pushes the TOAST principle, the idea that all you have to do is buy Brand X and you never have to take responsibility for your own security. Though, of course, “who’s to blame?” is the wrong question: what matters is “how do we fix it?”

Scareware and Legitimate Marketing

Kurt Wismer posted a much-to-the-point blog a few days ago about the way that purveyors of scareware (fake/rogue anti-virus/security products) mimic the marketing practices of legitimate security providers. You may remember that a while ago, I commented here about a post by Rob Rosenberger that made some related points. If you’re a regular reader of

Support Scam Info: Some More Links

Further to my last blog here, it seems that I've been missing some serious fake AV telephone scam action. Some links provided by my good friend Steve B. Nice one, Steve. :) ALERT: metsupport.com – yet another telephone based fraud (aka SupportOnClick revisited – again) http://hphosts.blogspot.com/2010/06/alert-metsupportcom-yet-another.html techonsupport.com, click4rescue.com, pcrescueworld.com: SupportOnClick revisited http://hphosts.blogspot.com/2009/12/techonsupportcom-click4rescuecom.html SupportOnClick: Phoned by

Virus, Anti-Virus, Fake Anti-Virus

Round here, we're more than a little concerned about fake/rogue antivirus (and other fake security software). It's an ugly form of ransomware that hurts its victims in many ways. It scares them by threatening dire consequences and damage from malware that doesn't exist (except in the sense that the fake AV is itself malware), in

Blog Spam? No Comment….

I’d like to say thanks to Sean, who commented on my first blog on Orbasoft blog spam (don’t miss the later blog!) as follows: "These people are still not telling the truth. This software has been tested several times in the last few days and has been verified as a Rogue. It is on average detecting

Orbasoft Comment Spam Revisited

Many thanks to Jens in Denmark, who commented on my previous blog about Orbasoft comment spam. Jens says: “Orbasoft is a real company, situated in Denmark. But they hired an Indian company to spam blogs with comments on their products (“search engine optimization”)…[they] wrote 300 positive comments – for the price of $900. ” Well,

Conficker: Before the Flood (April Showers)

I don’t, of course, know for sure what’s going to happen on April 1st, when Conficker is timed, potentially, to go to its next stage of evolution. We do know, from inspecting code in the variants and subvariants that have come our way, that infected machines will be looking for instructions and updates on that date. At the very least,

Xrupter – Scareware meets Ransomware

There are quite a few reports currently about particularly ugly development son the fake AV front. The Register’s John Leyden has referred to a "double dipping" attack, in which the notorious Antivirus 2009 is implicated in an attack that goes beyond offering useless rogue anti-malware to inflicting actual damage on user data files, in order to force the victim

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21 Aug 2014
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