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Exploit Protection for Microsoft Windows

we provide more detail on the most exploited applications and advise a few steps users can (and should) take to further strengthen their defenses.

Malware exploits death of North Korea's Kim Jong-il

As expected, malware developers and scam artists have greeted the death of North Korea's dictatorial leader, Kim Jong-il, with Black Hat SEO and Social Engineering attacks. The Supreme Leader of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea suffered a heart attack on a train journey last month and a steady stream of schemes to exploit the

Scams and the Beautiful Game

We like to give you plenty of warning when we suspect that something unpleasant is coming down the pike, even if it’s just one of those likely bursts of Black Hat SEO (web search poisoning) that come with a media-friendly event. Still, I suspect that if I told you we expect lots of malicious activity

PDFs Exploitable?!? I’m shocked…

September 2009 saw some key security analysis raining directly onto the Adobe PDF platform, particularly with SANS pointing towards remote code execution within PDFs as one of the top threat vectors: Adobe Acrobat, Reader, and Flash Player Remote Code Execution Vulnerability (CVE-2009-1862) Adobe Reader Remote Code Execution Vulnerability (CVE-2009-1493) Kudos to Adobe for patching these

World-Cup Malware: the Kick-Off

Looking into their crystal balls (no jokes, please) at the end of 2009, our colleagues in Latin America came up with a prophecy that was later incorporated into a white paper (2010: Cybercrime Coming of Age): In June 2010, one of the most popular regular sports events, the soccer World Cup, will take place in

Run! It’s the Fuzz!

Unfortunately, I'm not able to attend the CanSecWest 2010 conference in Vancouver this week, though I think Pierre-Marc will be there. I would have been more than a little interested in Charlie Miller's presentation on fuzzing Mac applications: that is, “…a method for discovering faults in software by providing unexpected input and monitoring for exceptions.” 

Patchwork for the Home and the Enterprise

SC Magazine's Dan Raywood reports that "To be completely patched requires an average of between 51 and 86 actions per year", quoting findings by Secunia that " in order for the typical home user to stay fully patched, an average of 75 patches from 22 different vendors need to be installed, requiring the user to

Adobe, Javascript, and the CVE-2009-4324 Exploit

There has been quite a lot of traffic in the last few weeks about the doc.media.newPlayer vulnerability referenced in the CVE database as CVE-2009-4324. The following Adobe articles refer: http://www.adobe.com/support/security/advisories/apsa09-07.html http://blogs.adobe.com/psirt/2009/12/new_adobe_reader_and_acrobat_v.html http://blogs.adobe.com/psirt/2009/12/security_advisory_apsa09-07_up.html Today's article at the Internet Storm Center by Bojan Zdrnja (http://isc.sans.org/diary.html?storyid=7867) gives a lot of detail on a particularly inventive exploit of the

June ThreatSense Report

We’ve just finished working on our monthly Threat Report. There aren’t many surprises in the top ten threats for June. Conficker has taken over the "top spot", relegating INF/Autorun to second place. It’s difficult to say for sure what the significance is, given the relatively small percentage point involved: minor fluctuations in proportions from month

PDFs Carry Swine Flu

OK, PDFs don’t actually carry the swine flu, but PDFs are used to make your computer sick. The bad guys know that many people will open anything, regardless of where it came from, if it has bad news in it. There have been a couple of vulnerabilities found in Adobe Acrobat recently. One of the

Adobe: Wake Up & Smell the Javascript

Ever since Adobe’s recent updates to Acrobat and Reader, I’ve been irritated by the fact that every time I open a PDF, I’m prompted to  re-enable JavaScript, which I disabled while we were all waiting patiently for those patches to the last round of vulnerabilities. "This document contains JavaScripts. Do you want to enable JavaScripts

Fake AV Spam and Selling Free Software

[Updated after further investigation.] For the past few days, I’ve been seeing spam to one of my accounts offering me various bits of software. Nothing unusual about that, of course, but this one was better constructed than usual, and consistent, and I made a mental note to look more closely when I’m a little less

Acrobat Amendment

A reminder about about the Acrobat reader vulnerability we blogged about several times recently (http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/?p=593, http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/?p=579, http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/?p=572). Remember I said "As we’ve said previously, disabling JavaScript, while it doesn’t address the underlying vulnerability, stops known exploits from working properly"? Predictably, there are now known exploits that don’t use the JavaScript heap spray trick. While I’m

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13 Dec 2013
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