tag
packer

Come along, little doggy, come along

The most common malware technique for avoiding detection is to create loads of “fresh” variants. Actually, the component that changes so frequently is the packer – the outer layer of the malware, used by malware authors to encrypt the malware and make it harder to detect – whilst the functionality of the malicious code inside

Obfuscated JavaScript: Oh What a Tangled Web

My colleague Daniel Novomeský alerted me to a problem he's observed with the way some web-developers use JavaScript: a few of them have the habit of obfuscating JavaScript code on their web sites, presumably in order to compress it so that it takes less disk-space ("packing") or using a "protector" in order to make it

False Positives: A Round of Applause…

The anti-malware industry isn't a suitable environment for the thin-skinned. We get used to receiving "more kicks than ha'pence" (see http://www.virusbtn.com/spambulletin/archive/2006/11/vb200611-OK).. In particular, I've grown accustomed to the fact that many people expect all the following from an AV product: Absolute Protection Absolute Convenience Absolutely no  False Positives Absolutely no charge False positives (FPs) are

Another Big Botnet

There is some chatter about a news item that has been released by Finjan in a blog post this morning.  The news has been picked up by Computer Weekly and USA Today. The un-named bot involved in this story is detected by ESET as Win32/Hexzone.AP.  It is a typical Trojan that reports to a command

Win32/Waledac for Valentine’s Day

As Valentine’s Day is approaching the criminals behind Win32/Waledac have increased their activity. The Valentine campaign started some time ago but the interesting part is only starting for us.  The Waledac botnet has been using fast flux for some time now.  This means that the IP addresses of the websites used to distribute this malware

Fake Holiday eCards: Are You Surprised?

Yesterday, we started to receive reports of emails pretending to carry links to holiday cards.  These emails contain a link that points to a file named ecard.exe.  Of course, this executable is not a seasonal holiday card but malware.  The reason this wave of malware has attracted our attention is that it is very similar

Follow Us

Automatically receive new posts via email:

Delivered by FeedBurner

1 article related to:
Hot Topic
ESET Virus Radar

Archives

Select month
Copyright © 2014 ESET, All Rights Reserved.