iPhone Hack Tool: a Postscript

Update: there's more information on the Windows 7 exploit mentioned below in a Register article at http://reg.cx/1FcX. Update 2: I keep seeing references to this as a virus or worm. However, the code I've seen does not contain any self-replicative functionality. It's not even a Trojan, as such. Following an extract from one of my

Hacker tool exploits vulnerability in jailbroken iPhones

I don't really want to keep banging on about jailbroken iPhones when there are threats out there that affect many more people (though according to Intego, 6-8% of iPhones are, in fact, jailbroken, so I don't want to minimize the threat either). I'm quoting Intego because they've just blogged (http://blog.intego.com/2009/11/11/intego-security-memo-hacker-tool-copies-personal-info-from-iphones/) what I think is a

ikee iPhone iWorm iSource: iYukkkkk!!!!

Inevitably, the source code for the ikee worm I mentioned in a previous blog (http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/2009/11/10/iworm-ikee-sex-and-drugs-and-rick-and-roll) has crept back out from under its rock. It's probably equally inevitable that there'll be more script-kiddy attempts to produce variants and it will be easier for heavy-duty malware creators to produce new malware using similar techniques, if they're so-minded. If you

iWorm ikee: Sex and Drugs and Rick and Roll

The iPhone, it seems, is under siege: a recent worm exploits a known (and previously exploited) vulnerability that affects the owners of "jailbroken" phones on which OpenSSH has been installed. (Jailbreaking allows iPhone users to install and use unapproved applications.) Of course, there's been an enormous amount of media coverage on this already (I've just


Kelly Jackson Higgins with Dark Reading reported that the anti-phishing technology on the iPhone is currently not working. You can read the article at http://www.darkreading.com/security/client/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=219700594&cid=nl_DR_DAILY_T The truth is that no anti-phishing technology is reliable. The technologies can help, sometimes significantly, but the most effective protection is an educated user. All of the technologies have failure

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