tag
hoax

Facebook to start charging $2.99/month? It’s nonsense!

Thousands of Facebook addicts are feverishly sharing a “news report” claiming that from November 1st you’ll be paying $2.99 every month to access the site.

Scandal video of Justin Bieber: just don’t click here!

I received a “shared” messages from a friend about “a leaked scandal video of Justin Bieber and Selana Gomez” promising a “naked Justin Bieber”, with a Photoshopped picture, which we – for family-friendliness – censored a bit.

Yesterday’s Virus Hoax is Today’s Fake Utility

One of the (few) blessings of having been so long in this industry is that I remember a time when most malware was viral and Trojans were rare: so rare, in fact, that there was at one time a notorious "dirty dozen" set of Trojans.  At around the same time, there were innumerable hoaxes describing malware with

Osama bin Laden is alive and well… on Facebook

The death of Osama bin Laden has gone viral, with blogs, social media and search engines pumping terabytes of rumor, innuendo and conspiracy theories at the speed of light, along with the occasional kilobyte of truth.  As the number of people searching for pictures and videos of bin Laden’s execution has skyrocketed, the criminal syndicates

Global malware thrives on the demise of a global terrorist

[NOTE:  As we were publishing this articl, our Latin American office discovered another Black Hat SEO campaign incorporating promises of Osama bin Laden videos on Facebook.  Click here to view their article in Spanish. We will follow up on this shortly.  AG] The malware phenomenon started by the announcement of Osama Bin Laden’s death continues

Cyberthieves just love a good wedding, or a funeral…

Not using Twitter or Facebook is, in these times, akin to not owning or using a mobile ‘phone. Last night’s events – the reported death of Osama Bin Laden – proved that we are well and truly in the Twitter era (Twitter reported that over 4000 tweets per second were made immediately preceding the President’s

Ginger Rogers hoax

I've been coming across several references to an email and Facebook hoax relating to a YouTube that's claimed to show 92-year-old Ginger Rogers dancing with her great-grandson. Of course, it isn't: she died in 1995 in her 80s. This isn't a threat: it's a genuine movie and an interesting enough story to stand on its own,

ROFLing Around The Christmas Tree*

…conceptually there is a direct line of succession from this worm to the social engineering worm/Trojan hybrids of the early noughties. Clearly, the line continues through to the social network malware (real and memetic) of today…

Email Scam Resource

On Guard Online, has a number of other useful-looking pages, though I haven’t checked them all out personally: for example, talking to children about privacy and the internet, other forms of fraud and abuse, and social networking.

Cell Phone Telemarketing Hoax

You may have received an email message that looks something like this. (ESET was just asked about it – thanks to Chris Dale for passing it on.) Please note: this is, if not an out-and-out hoax, a very misleading message. Don't act upon it until you've read the rest of this article. REMEMBER: Cell Phone

Anaconda, or a Monty Python sketch?

…you might wonder how a South American snake came to swallow an African mammal in the first place. (Don’t bother with the jokes about zoo viruses. I got there first.)

Armor-Piercing Rounds for Chain Mail

In my copious free time, I contribute to and in some cases maintain a number of other blogs (the ones with a security bias are listed in my signature here). The chainmail/hoax checking page at http://chainmailcheck.wordpress.com/ was specifically set up to explore a hoax/chainletter mitigation project that's still in the preparatory stages, but I've been posting

Corpus Christi Hoax Mail

Bill B. forwarded an interesting hoax mail to my "hoaxchecker" account (hoaxchecker [at] gmail [dot] com. The hoax isn't so interesting in itself, in that it's been around quite a while, as is described at the ever-dependable hoax resource snopes.com. But I do find interesting the fact that this particular variant includes some wrinkles that

Hoaxes and semi-hoaxes

Eveline Goy commented on a previous blog on "When is a hoax not a hoax?", and I thought it was too good a comment to let it lie unnoticed. Dear Mr Harley You might be interested to know that the MISSING GIRL email re Rachelle Marie Smith is now being distributed in Australia.   Of course

Unnamed App: it’s the SEO that matters, not the app

As more information and discussion has come in on this, it now merits an update in its own right. It seems that there is at least one other unnamed app around as well as the Boxes issue, and while I've no reason to assume that it's malicious, I'd hardly advise that you rush into installing

Unnamed App Facebook Scam

[Update: There's been quite a lot of discussion and extra information coming in on this. It seems to me that there is at least one unnamed app around as well as the Boxes issue, and while I've no reason to assume that it's malicious, I'd hardly advise that you rush into installing an application when

Whatever Happened to the Unlikely Lads? – Conference Paper

Here's another conference paper we've put up recently on the white papers page at http://www.eset.com/download/whitepapers.php. "Whatever Happened to the Unlikely Lads? A Hoaxing Metamorphosis" by David Harley and Randy Abrams, was presented at the 19th Virus Bulletin Conference in Geneva in 2009, The paper was first published in Virus Bulletin 2009 Conference Proceedings. Copyright is

Great Hoax From Little Acorns…

I learned a new word today. "Glurge", according to snopes.com, an essential resource when checking the validity of dubious chain letters, glurge is the sending of inspirational (and supposedly true) tales … that often … undermine their messages by fabricating and distorting historical fact in the guise of offering a "true story". I came across

When is a Hoax not a Hoax?

Embarrassingly, I keep catching myself promising to come back to a topic and never getting round to it, however often I try to blog here. (The server is gradually filling up with my half-completed drafts!) There are just too many interesting things happening and not enough time to record them all here – this isn’t, after

PSST! It’s PFTS!

PSST! Anyone remember the Telephone party game, also known by various politically incorrect names like Chinese Whispers and Russian Scandal? A series of reports like this and this illustrate a textbook example of how rumour and misunderstanding (some of it probably wilful) can transform a story into something very different to its original form. According

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