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Data Protection Act

Your Data and Your Credit Card

[Update: I had a couple of machine crashes while I was writing this, and only just realized that a pointer to Allan Dyer's excellent article at http://articles.yuikee.com.hk/newsletter/2009/12/a.html hadn't survived to the final version. Which is a pity, because it's very relevant, and well worth reading.] Over the weekend, I posted a blog on the AVIEN site

The Internet Book of the Dead

This blog is a bit of an oddity. ESET UK were approached by Dan Damon, a reporter putting together a piece about “the complications of a digital world when someone passes away”, asking if there was someone at ESET who would be interested in being interviewed for BBC1 radio on the subject. The request got

Public Health and the BCS

SC Magazine included an interesting item today on security and confidentiality in the UK’s National Health Service. Anders Pettersson has suggested that the NHS is too busy to be harrassed over data protection/data leakage issues, and that the security industry should "come together to educate NHS Trusts and other organizations on simple measures to protect

California Healthcare Breaches

Sadly, I’m now back in not-so-sunny England, but one of my colleagues forwarded me an item about security breaches reported by healthcare organizations. On January 1st it became mandatory in California for such organizations to report incidents where non-anonymized patient data may be been intentionally or unintentionally disclosed to someone unauthorized. In the first five months,

Data Protection: not a priority?

Data protection in the UK and Europe may mean something a little different to the way most Americans would understand it. The UK’s Data Protection Act is, like other local legislation in EC countries enacting the EU directive Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC, concerned less with the security mechanisms you use (or don’t use) to protect your

Fraud in (and out of) a Time of Recession

I’ve been asked several times in the past few months about links between the global recession and criminal activity, especially as related to fraud. There are, of course, those who claim that the economic situation is directly caused by "criminal" activity by politicians and banks, which is a little further than I’d care to go personally. What

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14 Dec 2009
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