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Adobe

Exploit Protection for Microsoft Windows

we provide more detail on the most exploited applications and advise a few steps users can (and should) take to further strengthen their defenses.

Facebook helps out users who used same password on Adobe – by blocking them

Facebook users who used the same email and password on their Adobe and Facebook accounts have been offered a helping hand by Facebook in the wake of the recent massive breach at Adobe, which leaked account data for 38 million users.

Adobe and Microsoft release critical patches for March

Adobe and Microsoft have both released patches this week to address vulnerabilities in respective software applications and advise all users to apply the patches as soon as possible, if applicable to them.

Much Ado About Facebook

The Reuters news agency reported earlier today a sudden increase in violent and pornographic images and videos on Facebook.  A quick review of my personal account and a check-in with my other Facebook-wielding colleagues revealed a couple of nothing more than a couple of suggestive pictures, complete with snarky comments embedded in them, from the

New Apple OS X Malware: Fake Adobe Flash Installer

A new attack against Apple Mac OS X Lion (10.7) has been detected by Intego. The threat is a Trojan, dubbed Flashback, installed via a fake Adobe Flash installer downloaded from a third party site. As with the MacDefender and Revir malware, the Flashback attack uses social engineering to entice the user to download then

Fake Windows Updates Are Easy to Avoid

Our friends (and competitors) at Sophos blogged about a new threat that poses as a Windows Update and then infects unsuspecting users with a fake antivirus product. The update appears to be very real and is tricking users. While my colleagues at Sophos offer excellent advice to help people protect themselves (as I believe we

Adobe Flash, The Spy in Your Computer – Part 5

I didn’t expect a part 5, but here it is! Adobe has announced that they will be making some significant changes to Flash. In a blog post http://blogs.adobe.com/flashplatform/2011/01/on-improving-privacy-managing-local-storage-in-flash-player.html Adobe’s marketing machine really pours it on thick, but there appears to be some good news. In the blog it is stat4ed that a future release of

Adobe Flash, The Spy in Your Computer – Part 2

In the first part of this blog I told you how to use the basic Flash configuration utility. This blog is for the techies. This time I’ll share with you how to shut the doors on Flash and only open them to the sites you want to trust. Very few people seem to know that

Adobe Flash, The Spy in Your Computer – Part 1

Adobe Flash is, in my opinion, the most ubiquitous spyware in the world and no products detect it as such. The reason it goes undetected is that it also has numerous legitimate uses, however, there is growing evidence that indicates significant abuse. This will be the first in a series of blogs in which I

Adobe Updates

Adobe has just released an update for 20 vulnerabilities in Shockwave Player, most of which could allow an attacker to execute malicious code. The bulletin APSB10-20 – Security update available for Shockwave Player – refers. According to Jeremy Kirk's Macworld report and the Adobe advisory, the vulnerabilities affect both Windows and OS X versions up to

Adobe, Make My Day Too….

Adobe, when I disable JavaScript, STOP SILENTLY RE-ENABLING IT WHEN YOU UPDATE….

Fake Adobe Updates

Adobe's Product Security Incident Response Team (PSIRT) reports  that malicious emails are circulating claiming to be Adobe security updates, many of them signed by "James Kitchin" of "Adobe Risk Management", or a similar (presumably mythical) team. Adobe says that the messages include links to download instructions for a security update that addresses "CVE-2010-0193 Denial of Service

World-Cup Malware: the Kick-Off

Looking into their crystal balls (no jokes, please) at the end of 2009, our colleagues in Latin America came up with a prophecy that was later incorporated into a white paper (2010: Cybercrime Coming of Age): In June 2010, one of the most popular regular sports events, the soccer World Cup, will take place in

Patchwork for the Home and the Enterprise

SC Magazine's Dan Raywood reports that "To be completely patched requires an average of between 51 and 86 actions per year", quoting findings by Secunia that " in order for the typical home user to stay fully patched, an average of 75 patches from 22 different vendors need to be installed, requiring the user to

Adobe, Javascript, and the CVE-2009-4324 Exploit

There has been quite a lot of traffic in the last few weeks about the doc.media.newPlayer vulnerability referenced in the CVE database as CVE-2009-4324. The following Adobe articles refer: http://www.adobe.com/support/security/advisories/apsa09-07.html http://blogs.adobe.com/psirt/2009/12/new_adobe_reader_and_acrobat_v.html http://blogs.adobe.com/psirt/2009/12/security_advisory_apsa09-07_up.html Today's article at the Internet Storm Center by Bojan Zdrnja (http://isc.sans.org/diary.html?storyid=7867) gives a lot of detail on a particularly inventive exploit of the

Ten Ways to Dodge Cyber-Bullets (Part 2)

[Part 2 of an occasional series, updating a blog series I ran in early 2009 to reflect changes in the threat landscape. This series will also be available shortly as a white paper.] Catch the Patch Batch Keep applications and operating system components up-to-date with automated updates and patches, and by regularly reviewing the vendors’ product

PDF – Pretty Darned Fatal

Adobe PDF files were supposed to be a safe alternative to Microsoft Word documents in a time when Microsoft offered no effective protection against macro viruses and had virtually no security model in Office at all. Times change. Microsoft Word documents rarely spread macro viruses and have not for a long time if you are

Adobe Flash Settings

As I previously pointed out http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/2009/08/04/calling-adobe%E2%80%99s-bluff, Adobe is at best deceptive about claims of the security and privacy of Flash. Even if you do not know what flash is or how to find it, you probably have it on your computer. If you open control panel and go to the “add or remove programs” application

Ditch Adobe?

Stephen Northcutt, with the SANS Technology Institute, suggested the following in the SANS NewsBites Vol. 11 Num. 61: [Editor’s Note (Northcutt): I think organizations should avoid Adobe if possible.  Adobe security appears to be out of control, and using their products seems to put your organization at risk. Try to minimize your attack surface. Limit

Calling Adobe’s Bluff

Dear Adobe, It is time to put up or shut up. Your web site FAQ http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/security/privacy_policy/faq.html has the following entry: Does Flash Player compromise my privacy and security? No. Flash Player is not only the most widely distributed piece of software on the Internet today, it’s also one of the most secure. Given that Flash

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13 Dec 2013
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