ACAD/Medre.A 10000′s of AutoCAD files leaked in suspected industrial espionage

The malware news today is all about new targeted, high-tech, military grade malicious code such as Stuxnet, Duqu and Flamer that have grabbed headlines. So imagine our surprise when an AutoCAD worm, written in AutoLISP, the scripting language that AutoCAD uses, suddenly showed a big spike in one country on ESET’s LiveGrid® two months ago,

CVE2012-1889: MSXML use-after-free vulnerability

As soon as Microsoft had released patches for security bulletin MS12-037 (which patched 13 vulnerabilities for Internet Explorer) Google published information (Microsoft XML vulnerability under active exploitation) about a new zero-day vulnerability (CVE-2012-1889) in Microsoft XML Core Services. Sometimes vulnerabilities are discovered at a rate that outpaces the patching process and so a temporary fix

Back to school scams? They may be just around the corner

Just as I was putting the finishing touches on a blog post about the need to keep your data and devices safe on summer travels, I got an email from Apple letting me know that now was a great time to buy a Mac for college. I don't plan to go back to college at

Data security and digital privacy on the road, what travelers should know

Summer is here and for many families that means travels plans, but do your summer travel plans include taking care of your data and digital devices? Which digital devices do you plan to take on your trip and what sort of data do they contain? Perhaps more importantly: What kind of data can they access?

Facebook policy changes – does the ‘crowd’ really have a seat at the table?

You may have heard that the organization known as europe-v-facebook found that a little-know provision in Facebook’s privacy and user rights policies allowed a vote on proposed changes to be forced if over 7,000 respondents were interested and submitted comments to that effect. When europe-v-facebook publicized this, users swarmed to show support and get their

Close call with a Caribbean cruise line scam

In the middle of working on a blog post about SMS phishing scams at my desk last night, I received a rather strange call.  The number displayed on the Caller ID was +1 (360) 474-3925.  I did not recognize the number, but since it was 7:10PM, I assumed it was a colleague trying to reach

The Flame Virus Part Two: State Sponsored Cyber Attacks

Audio: /us/resources/podcasts/061512_ESET_FlamePart2.mp3

SMSmishing Unabated: Best Buy targeted by fake gift card campaign

News of SMS (text) phishing scams are nothing new to readers of this blog.  ESET researcher Cameron Camp recently wrote an article explaining how they work and how to avoid them here on ESET’s Threat Blog: SMSmishing (SMS Text Phishing) – how to spot and avoid scams, And just before Valentine’s Day, my colleague Stephen

Your Facebook account will be terminated – again

If the scary email or app notification–and subsequent webpage–is to be believed, you have only a few days to verify your Facebook account or you’ll be out of luck. But don’t worry, a few days later you will magically get a few more days to verify, and so the scam goes. A Twitter follower with

The negative impact on GDP of state-sponsored malware like Stuxnet and Flame

The slow drip of revelations about Flame have kept this piece of malware in the news for more than two weeks so it is worth reminding people that most antivirus programs now protect against Flame (ESET products detect it as Win32/Flamer.A). The coverage of Flame was boosted last week by a conveniently-timed assist from leaks

The Flame Virus Part One: Attacks on The Middle East

Audio: /us/resources/podcasts/060812_ESET_FlamePart1.mp3

Guarding against password reset attacks with pen and paper

With the recent announcements of password breaches at LinkedIn, and warnings from Google about state-sponsored attacks on Gmail accounts, it seems like a good idea now to review some password security basics.  In this blog post, we’re going to take a look at a rather low-tech solution to a decidedly high-tech problem:  How to guard

Passwords and PINs: the worst choices

It’s important to know the worst password choices, but also the worst choices for numeric passcodes.

LinkedIn security woes – and what to do about it

This morning when I logged into LinkedIn I was greeted with several front page references to the reported hacking of the site, and instructions for changing my password, which I did immediately. This is a good time to change all of your social media passwords, making sure you create a fresh password that is hard

You've Got (Nation State Hacked) Mail

We read in the New York Times that Google is rolling out a service that will attempt to alert users when it thinks their accounts might be subject to hacking by a government, hoping the user will take precautions after getting a notice that says “Warning: We believe state-sponsored attackers may be attempting to compromise

Smartcard vulnerabilities in modern banking malware

Aleksandr Matrosov and Eugene Rodionov presented their research into “Smartcard vulnerabilities in modern banking malware” at PHDays’2012.

Carberp and Hodprot: six more gang members held

Group-IB and ESET Russia assisted in the investigation that led to the arrest of 6 people suspected of stealing 125m roubles from bank customers in Russia .

Stuxnet, Flamer, Flame, Whatever Name: There's just no good malware

A week ago the big malware news was the code known as Flame, Flamer, or sKyWIper (detected by ESET as Win32/Flamer.A), then on June 1, this news broke: "A damaging cyberattack against Iran’s nuclear program was the work of U.S. and Israeli experts and proceeded under the secret orders of President Obama." (Washington Post)  Clearly,

The Old Fashion Phone Scam: The Latest Tricks Scammers Are Using To Get Your Personal Info.

Aryeh Goretsky on the latest tricks used by phone scammers to bypass the FTC’s do-not-call list restrictions and scam people out of their credit cards.

DNSChanger temporary’ DNS servers go dark soon: is your computer really fixed?

DNSChanger, a piece of malware that re-routed vast swathes of Internet traffic through rogue DNS servers after users became infected, was shut down by the FBI late last year. But simply shutting down the servers altogether would have ‘broken’ many hundreds of thousands of computers still infected–rendering it difficult for them to get help via

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