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Online Shopping and a Phishing Pheeding Phrenzy

Basics of phishing. Part 1 of a three-part article on phishing scams old and new, and some of the ways to recognize the baited hook.

Twitter Security: Tweetie Pie Panic

[Update info moved to new blog post on 6th January] In deference to all those old enough to get a panic attack when reminded of how bad pop music was capable of being in the 1970s, I’ll try to overcome by the urge to mention “Chirpy Chirpy Tweet Tweet”. Anyway, to business. Having all the

The Thoughtful Phisher II

In the previous Thoughtful Phisher blog, we looked at some visual clues that should tip you off that a email from a ‘bank’ is not to be trusted. Just as interesting here, though, is the variety of social engineering gambits used by this wave of phish campaigns. It’s worth taking a closer look at some

Phishing Persistence

Here’s something I haven’t noticed before (but then I don’t pay nearly as much attention to phishing messages as I used to, owing to the need to sleep occasionally). I’ve started to receive messages purporting to be from the Alliance and Leicester, in the UK. The messages are much the same, apart from the Subject

Tax Scams, Malware, Phishing and a 419

A roundup of scam information, including a tax scams article, email with a link to malware, a phish, and the worlds laziest 419.

Phishing and Taxes: a dead CERT?

ZeuS-related malware appears to be sent by US-CERT and also misuses the name of APWG (the Anti-Phishing Working Group).

No Stone Left Unturned

We have discussed SEO poisoning extensively in the ESET Threat Blog, and it should come as no surprise to our readers that any topic which trends up quickly in search engine traffic will be exploited by the criminals who specialize in such activities.  The poisoned search term du jour is "erin andrews death threat".  Apparently,

iPad scammers target the unwary

The Apple iPad is the current gadget du jour amongst the digerati and has been seeing strong presales, with estimates as high as 150,000 units on the first day.  With such attention in the media and the blogosphere, it is no wonder that both legitimate businesses and scammers have taken to using it as bait

The Return of Jacques Tits

It has been a year since we last discussed fraudulent domain name registrar scams and we wanted to let people know that this scam continues unabated. In a nutshell, a message is sent to a publicly-visible email address listed on your website (sales, support, the CEO's office, a public relations contact, et cetera) from a

The Blame Game

I recently learned a new acronym: SODDI (Some Other Dude Did It). What this refers to is the defense that criminals routinely use (plausible deniability) – and even more so when it comes to illicit activities on the Internet. On Sunday, November 8th 2009 the Associated Press published an article regarding an individual that was

Phishing the Web

A new advisory from the Anti-Phishing Working Group (APWG) offers advice to website owners on what actions to take when notified that their site or server has been compromised for use by phishers. At 18 pages, it’s a substantial high-level document, including: Some web site phishing attack and response scenarios Identifying an attack Reporting a

Online Shopping and a Phishing Pheeding Phrenzy [2]

Phishing scams and online shopping. Part 2 of a three-part article on phishing scams old and new, and some of the ways to recognize the baited hook.

Phishing Using HTML and Intranet Security Settings

Phishers always try to find new ways to bypass security features and trick ‘educated’ users. Over the years we have seen simplistic phishing attempts where the required information had to be typed into the e-mail body. This worked at that time because phishing was new and hardly anyone had a notion of the implications. Later,

Phishphloods: Not all Phishing is Spear-Phishing

You don't need more advice from me on avoiding phishing following the Epsilon fiasco: Randy, among others has posted plenty of sound advice, and I put some links to relevant articles here, though I don't know of anyone who's published a list of the whole 2,500 or so companies that are apparently Epsilon's customers, though comment threads

No Mule’s Fool

After a few years in the security business, it's easy to get a bit too used to the background noise, and forget that not everyone is familiar with concepts like phishing (see Randy's recent blog at http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/2009/11/16/once-upon-a-cybercrime%e2%80%a6), or botnets ("whatever they are", as my brother said to me quite recently), or money mules. I've written

Phishbait: not so much a Smile as a rictus

Below, you can see the textual part of a bank phishing email I received today (it also contained a Smile logo, which was the only graphical content).  Here’s the message text from the phishing email:  Dear Account Holder, Do you know that with Smile Internet banking, you can eliminate the cost of receiving and transferring

Windows 8: there’s more to security than the Operating System

Disasters, new hardware, new software: to the phish scammer, it’s all potential bait for reeling in victims.

Phear of Phishing

(All four blog articles in this series, of which this article is the last, are available as a single paper here: The_Thoughtful_Phisher_Revisited.) From the sort of ‘visit this link and update or we’ll cancel your account’ message that we saw in the previous blog in this series (The Less Thoughtful Phisher), it’s a short step

Anti-Phishing Day

Too bad it doesn’t exist. I mean really exist. Here is how an anti-phishing day that is designed to be a highly effective educational deterrent to phishing would work. Google, Facebook, Hotmail, Yahoo, Twitter, Myspace, Banks, Online Gaming sites, such as World of WarCraft, and others would all send phishing emails to their users. Yes,

SEO poisoning, Londoning and Icelanding

I was asked whether I'd seen SEO (Search Engine Optimization) poisoning relating to the Icelandic eruption and the very widespread grounding of aircraft in Europe. Well, there were certainly attempts in March to exploit the earlier Eyjafjallajokull eruption in order to drive googlers interested in finding out more towards malicious web sites. So it would be naive

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