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ThreatSense

Autorun and Conficker not dead yet: Threat Trends Report

The two most prevalent threats over 2011 were still INF/Autorun and Conficker: ESET’s December ThreatSense Report looks at threat trends in the new year.

IRISSCERT, ESET Ireland and the Luck of the Irish

The IRISSCERT conference in Dublin has drawn attention to Irish cybercrime statistics since January 2011.

August ThreatSense Report

ESET’s August ThreatSense report is now available on the Threat Center page.

ESET July Threat Report

There is some pretty interesting content in ESET’s Threat Report for July.

April: that’s so last month

April? Haven't we moved on from there? Well, yes, but ESET's ThreatSense report for April does include, apart from some information on the top ten threats for the month, a feature article by Urban Schrott on the far-from-dead 419 scam, some information on recent and upcoming events such as the AMTSO workshop (which I've just attended: much more information on

Threat Trends Report

The March Threatsense report at http://www.eset.com/us/resources/threat-trends/Global_Threat_Trends_March_2011.pdf includes, apart from the Top Ten threats: a feature article on Japanese-disaster-related scamming by Urban Schrott and myself news of the Infosec Europe expo in London on the 19th-21st April, the AMTSO and CARO workshops in Prague in May, and the EICAR Conference in Austria that follows the story of

February ThreatSense Report

The February ThreatSense Report is now available…

Threatsense Report: Looking Forward, Looking Back

The December ThreatSense report, being the last report of the year, is a little bigger than usual, and takes a longer view.

How to Fool a Security Researcher

…Andrew Lee conducted a fun but disquieting thought experiment in the course of an amusing and informative presentation on user education at the recent Virus Bulletin Seminar…

Monthly ThreatSense Report: What Do You Think?

In March 2010 we changed the format of this document, as we found that some people thought it was just a list of the top ten threats, which hasn’t been the case for a long while. Of course, those data are still included, but we’ve moved them to the end of the document. As you’ll

New Documents

Just a quick note to draw your attention to a couple of new documents that have just become available. "AMTSOlutely fabulous" (sorry – it seemed like a good idea when I wrote it…) is a review of what the Anti-Malware Testing Standards Organization has achieved so far and what it might achieve in the future. It's

Above the Clouds

ThreatSense.Net® is a form of distributed computing that for several years has supplemented and extended the capabilities of the ThreatSense® detection engine, which is the heart of the advanced heuristics that characterize ESET products. ThreatSense.Net® sends back information to the Virus Labs on both known and new threats. As well as tracking the prevalence of

Pre/Post Infection Detection

I just noticed a blog on "Security vendor’s “top-threat” list proof for their less-than-perfect performance?" at http://hype-free.blogspot.com/2010/01/security-vendors-top-threat-list-proof.html. The essential point seems to be that periodic virus detection statistics (like our monthly ThreatSense reports) are likely to be based in part on infections spotted on a protected machine when a signature/update is released that wasn't available

End of Year, End of Decade

As our December ThreatSense report (now available at http://www.eset.com/threat-center/threat_trends/Global_Threat_Trends_December_2009.pdf) was not only the last of the year but the last of the decade, it's rather longer and more detailed than usual, including a look back at the last 12 months. I suppose we could have gone back over the whole decade, but I have to

The out-of-control decade

We interrupt our – well, my – scheduled programming to bring to your attention an article in "The Register" that I think deserves your attention. I put up what was intended to be a brief pointer on the AVIEN blog (http://avien.net/blog/?p=253), but I found myself kind of warming to the subject, to the extent that I

September’s Global Threat Report

ESET released its Global Threat Report for the month of September, 2009, identifying the top ten threats seen during the month by ESET's ThreatSense.Net™ cloud.  You can view the report here and, as always, the complete collection is available here in the Threat Trends section of our web site.  While the report identifies a number

(Win32/)Induc-tive Reasoning

I was passed a query from a journalist in the UK about Win32/Induc.A, the Delphi infector both Randy and I have blogged about previously, asking whether ESET has figures supporting my contention that this "harmless" malware actually has the potential to cause significant damage, as he had seen no reports of "even minor disruption." While

The Retro-Virus

Nowadays we see lots of malicious software that is designed to steal money and information. A new virus was recently discovered that seems to be all about proving a concept rather than blatant maliciousness. The Win32/Induc.A virus does not infect like most viruses do. Delphi is a programming language. Induc infected the Delphi IDE so

ThreatSense.Net® Report for July

Our July ThreatSense.Net® report has been released today, and will eventually be available from the Threat Center page here. Most of the top ten entries are old friends: well, familiar names might be a better way of putting it. One of the disadvantages of having a scanner that makes heavy use of advanced heuristics is

June ThreatSense Report

We’ve just finished working on our monthly Threat Report. There aren’t many surprises in the top ten threats for June. Conficker has taken over the "top spot", relegating INF/Autorun to second place. It’s difficult to say for sure what the significance is, given the relatively small percentage point involved: minor fluctuations in proportions from month

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