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threat trends

2012 malware Top Ten and revisiting 2012′s Threatblog

Apparently we posted 235 blogs here in 2012, just a fraction under 20 blogs per month on average. So this would be a perfect moment to produce one of those summaries of the year’s activities that wordpress.com provides, telling you how many people viewed your blog site and how many times they’d go round the

Threat Reports and other Information

Information about the August Global Threat Report and where to find other ESET resources

Autorun and Conficker not dead yet: Threat Trends Report

The two most prevalent threats over 2011 were still INF/Autorun and Conficker: ESET’s December ThreatSense Report looks at threat trends in the new year.

Potentially Unwanted Applications White Paper Updated

Our white paper on Potentially Unwanted Applications (PUAs) has been revised with additional information, including information about how legitimate software can become classified as a PUA due to its misuse, a discussion of a type of downloader called a software wrapper and updated screen shots. It can be found in the White Papers section  Problematic,

A dozen predictions for 2012

While I share the reluctance of my colleagues to predict the future, I think there are some trends that can be classified as “reasonably likely to occur” in 2012. I make no promises, but here’s what I think we will see, in no particular order of importance or certainty. We will see increased interest in

April: that’s so last month

April? Haven't we moved on from there? Well, yes, but ESET's ThreatSense report for April does include, apart from some information on the top ten threats for the month, a feature article by Urban Schrott on the far-from-dead 419 scam, some information on recent and upcoming events such as the AMTSO workshop (which I've just attended: much more information on

Threat Trends Report

The March Threatsense report at http://www.eset.com/us/resources/threat-trends/Global_Threat_Trends_March_2011.pdf includes, apart from the Top Ten threats: a feature article on Japanese-disaster-related scamming by Urban Schrott and myself news of the Infosec Europe expo in London on the 19th-21st April, the AMTSO and CARO workshops in Prague in May, and the EICAR Conference in Austria that follows the story of

Soothsaying, Forsooth!

If you haven’t yet had enough of the crystall balls that have been bouncing all over the media and the blogosphere in the past few weeks…

Threatsense Report: Looking Forward, Looking Back

The December ThreatSense report, being the last report of the year, is a little bigger than usual, and takes a longer view.

New Documents

Just a quick note to draw your attention to a couple of new documents that have just become available. "AMTSOlutely fabulous" (sorry – it seemed like a good idea when I wrote it…) is a review of what the Anti-Malware Testing Standards Organization has achieved so far and what it might achieve in the future. It's

PDFs Exploitable?!? I’m shocked…

September 2009 saw some key security analysis raining directly onto the Adobe PDF platform, particularly with SANS pointing towards remote code execution within PDFs as one of the top threat vectors: Adobe Acrobat, Reader, and Flash Player Remote Code Execution Vulnerability (CVE-2009-1862) Adobe Reader Remote Code Execution Vulnerability (CVE-2009-1493) Kudos to Adobe for patching these

Operation Cyber ShockWave

While serving in the Marine Corps, one activity that I felt was effective in preparing both myself and my unit to be able to handle real-world scenarios, was getting as much experience as possible from military training exercises. In most cases multiple branches worked together or, as in the case with NATO exercises, multiple countries

Pre/Post Infection Detection

I just noticed a blog on "Security vendor’s “top-threat” list proof for their less-than-perfect performance?" at http://hype-free.blogspot.com/2010/01/security-vendors-top-threat-list-proof.html. The essential point seems to be that periodic virus detection statistics (like our monthly ThreatSense reports) are likely to be based in part on infections spotted on a protected machine when a signature/update is released that wasn't available

End of Year, End of Decade

As our December ThreatSense report (now available at http://www.eset.com/threat-center/threat_trends/Global_Threat_Trends_December_2009.pdf) was not only the last of the year but the last of the decade, it's rather longer and more detailed than usual, including a look back at the last 12 months. I suppose we could have gone back over the whole decade, but I have to

The out-of-control decade

We interrupt our – well, my - scheduled programming to bring to your attention an article in "The Register" that I think deserves your attention. I put up what was intended to be a brief pointer on the AVIEN blog (http://avien.net/blog/?p=253), but I found myself kind of warming to the subject, to the extent that I

Que Sera Sera – A Buffet of Predictions for 2010

I was recently asked to share some predictions about what 2010 will bring in the security space. I asked some colleagues from ESET Research to share their thoughts as well -Randy Randy Abrams Director of Technical Education Social Engineering attacks will continue to grow in prevalence. As operating systems and eventually applications become more secure,

The Blame Game

I recently learned a new acronym: SODDI (Some Other Dude Did It). What this refers to is the defense that criminals routinely use (plausible deniability) – and even more so when it comes to illicit activities on the Internet. On Sunday, November 8th 2009 the Associated Press published an article regarding an individual that was

September’s Global Threat Report

ESET released its Global Threat Report for the month of September, 2009, identifying the top ten threats seen during the month by ESET's ThreatSense.Net™ cloud.  You can view the report here and, as always, the complete collection is available here in the Threat Trends section of our web site.  While the report identifies a number

Data Breaches – It’s All Greek to Me

The results (released yesterday) from a study conducted by the Ponemon Institute yielded some interesting data points. The most visible of these was the finding that 85% of U.S. organizations experienced data breaches of varying magnitudes. This study, entitled "U.S. Enterprise Encryption Trends", has completed its fourth annual publication.  The data was directly obtained from

Global Threat Report 2008, other papers, and AMTSO

You may have noticed that I’ve been making a lot of references to this over the past few weeks. You can now download it here. Quite a few people have worked pretty hard to make this project happen, and I’d like to thank them now. I hope some of you will find it interesting and

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