Sony

Anonymous and the Megaupload Aftermath: Hacktivism or Just Plain Ugly?

Yesterday’s announcement by the US Department of Justice that the operators of file-sharing site Megaupload had been indicted for operating a criminal enterprise that generated over $175 million by trafficking in over half a billion dollars of pirated copyrighted material has sent shockwaves across the Internet. The accuracy of those figures may be questionable, but

Where there’s smoke, there’s FireWire

Forensic software developer PassWare announced a new version of its eponymous software forensics kit on Tuesday. Already several news sources are writing about how the program can automatically obtain the login password from a locked or sleeping Mac simply by plugging in a USB flash drive containing their software and connecting it to another computer

Sony Says Personally Identifiable Information Might Have Been Stolen

Today, June 8th Sony Pictures published a consumer alert on their site http://www.sonypictures.com/corp/consumeralert.html. The alert is about the data breach that was not discovered by Sony, but rather shoved in Sony’s face on June 2nd and specific details were confirmed by the Associated Press on June 3rd. Despite the fact that it was confirmed that

A Nice Pair of Breaches

…here’s a blog in stark contrast to Urban Schrott’s blog about good password practice in Ireland … Troy Hunt ran an analysis of the subset of stolen Sony Pictures passwords put out as a torrent by those nice boys at LulzSec, some 37,608 of them…

Sony USA has an Opening for a Senior Network Administrator

I wonder if that is a coincidence that Sony Corporation of America is looking for a Senior Network Systems Administrator considering an Associated Press article reported that victims of the latest Sony Pictures data breach have confirmed that the information that the blackhat group “Lulz Security” leaked was real information that did come from Sony

Sony Breached Again – User names and passwords published

In very troubling news it appears that Sony has been hacked again. This time a group that calls themselves “Lulz Security” claims that not only was the database breached by using a simple SQL injection attack but also that the passwords were stored in plain text. If this is true, storing the passwords in plain

Sony Identity Theft Protection (Are there Stingers in the Honey?)

In the wake of the massive PlayStation/Qriocity data breach Sony has announced that they will be providing a 1 year complimentary ID theft protection service through a company called Debix. In addition to the ID theft protection Sony is offering other “gestures” of goodwill. This all sounds good on the outside and the ID theft

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