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Patch

Keep Those Third Party Apps Patched!

You may have seen some news today about a new vulnerability that can potentially affect Windows Vista. Microsoft will have a patch for the flaw, hopefully before it is exploited. Of course, Microsoft had a patch for the flaw that Conficker exploited, but too many people are not patching anything.  It’s a good idea to

SMB2 zero-day

Some traffic has crossed my radar concerning a 0-day exploit that apparently enables a remote attacker to crash a Vista or Windows 7 system with SMB enabled (and according to subsequent reports, Server 2008). The original post and exploit are claimed to demonstrate the possibility of a Blue Screen Of Death (BSOD) and (normally) an automatic reboot when

Now You Can Fix Autorun

Microsoft has released the patches required to make autorun work with only CD and DVD drives. There is one little catch, a USB drive can be configured to look like a CD, but this patch definitely helps reduce risk. I highly recommend you install the patch so that you can connect most thumb drives, GPS

Crisis? What Crisis?

In the AV industry, we’re not unaccustomed to security scare stories met with a debunking response. For example, Peter Norton was quoted in 1988 in Insight as saying that computer viruses were an urban myth, like the alligators supposed to inhabit the sewers of New York. (He did change his mind around 1990 when he gave

Firefox: More Security, Less Privacy?

Perhaps I imagined it, but a few days ago when I allowed Firefox to update to fix security vulnerabilities my privacy settings were reset to less private settings. I had Firefox set to clear the history on exit, and prompt me. I also had it set not to accept third party cookies. After the upgrade

Potentially Abandoned Conficker Grows

Potentially Abandoned Conficker Grows According to an article at Internetnews.com http://www.internetnews.com/security/article.php/3832846 the authors of the Conficker botnet may have abandoned it, yet it continues to grow in numbers. The growth of the botnet is troubling because it is completely preventable and because it means the infected computers are vulnerable to other threats and that these

Adobe Update Update (Update?)

This is a quick follow-up to the earlier blog about Adobe updates. I’ve just received notification that the Adobe Flash Player updates bulletin released yesterday has been updated: it now contains information about (and links to) the promised Adobe Reader and Acrobat patches. Adobe states that it categorizes these updates as critical and recommends that you

Adobe Updates

I’d like to call your attention (again) to a major Adobe bulletin that was released yesterday (actually, still today, if you’re far enough behind GMT, but I’m sitting just a train ride away from Greenwich, UK). In brief, the bulletin concerns the following CVE (Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures) issues: CVE-2009-1862 CVE-2009-0901 CVE-2009-2395 CVE-2009-2493 CVE-2009-1863 CVE-2009-1864 CVE-2009-1865

You May Die from an Airbag

Yes, it is true. Airbags in cars save a whole bunch more lives than they end of costing, but sometimes, on rare occasions, they may take a life that otherwise would have been saved. Almost anyone, except the airbag instigators of the story, below understand the trade offs. The TechnologyBUFOON.com, I mean Technologyreview.com published the

Patchwork

I’ve been up to my ears in travelling and AMTSO and had limited connectivity over the last week, but even I noticed that a lot of patching issues have risen to the surface in the past few days. In case some of this has passed you by, here are a few of the more prominent

Adobe Reader & Acrobat: Updates on Updates

Well, I’ve still had no information about updates to address the recent Acrobat vulnerability/exploits to either of the addresses I subscribed to Adobe’s Security Notification Service. However, the RSS feed here does work. Which is how I know that Acrobat Reader 9.1 and 8.1.4 for Unix were released yesterday, right on time. As expected, these address the

Adobe Patches & Communication

Well, Adobe are still not speaking to me: I’ve had no information about updates to address the recent Acrobat vulnerability/exploits to either of the addresses I subscribed to its Security Notification Service. (See PPPS below.) However, something positive is happening out there in the old clay homestead: updates have arrived for a machine on which

Signed Updates and Social Engineering

Someone raised an interesting point in a comment to yesterday’s blog about Symantec’s own PIFTS.EXE being flagged by their own firewall as a possible problem. Let me quote the comment in full. I by no means buy into the super root-kit routine, I do however think that there will be copy cats (if not already)

Acrobat Amendment

A reminder about about the Acrobat reader vulnerability we blogged about several times recently (http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/?p=593, http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/?p=579, http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/?p=572). Remember I said "As we’ve said previously, disabling JavaScript, while it doesn’t address the underlying vulnerability, stops known exploits from working properly"? Predictably, there are now known exploits that don’t use the JavaScript heap spray trick. While I’m

Confounding Conficker

[Update: Spiegl Online reports (in German!) that the total may be as high as 50 million infected machines: however, this figure seems to be extrapolated from the number of infections picked up Panda's online scanner. Statistically, I'm not sure it makes any sense at all to try to correlate this self-selecting sample to the total population of

Confused about Conficker?

CNN reported that there a new sleeper virus out there. http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/ptech/01/16/virus.downadup/index.html There is nothing sleepy about the Conficker worm, it is wide awake and looking for people who are asleep at the security wheel. CNN reports that Conficker could allow hackers to steal personal and financial data, and they also report that it “it is

Self-Protection Part 8

Don’t expect antivirus alone to protect you from everything. Use additional measures such as a personal firewall, antispam and anti-phishing toolbars, but be aware that there is a lot of fake security software out there. This means that you need to take care to invest in reputable security solutions, not malware which claims to fix

Ten Ways to Protect Yourself: Part 2

Here’s the second instalment of the "ten ways to dodge cyberbullets" that I promised you. Keep applications and operating system components up-to-date with automated updates and patches, and by regularly reviewing the vendors’ product update sections on their web sites. This point is particularly  relevant right now, given the escalating volumes of Conficker that we’re

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10 Sep 2009
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