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Malware

Gamescom: How gaming grew up into a target for crime

Video games have gone since the late 1970s and early 1980s from being a small offshoot of the “traditional” computing industry to becoming a full-fledged multi-billion dollar industry – with its own brand of criminal.

Week in security: Blackphone unmasked, RATs vs Androids, and browsers kill cars

Blackphone, billed as a privacy tool to keep the puplic safe ruled the headlines when it was is hacked in five minutes, Meanwhile, Wi-Fi routers were also shown up – and Android users face a toothy new threat,

Gamescom 2014: World of Malware?

The gaming industry keeps growing, and the crowds at Cologne’s Gamescom 2014, show why big game titles are rapidly becoming a target for cybercrime. Our tips will help you enjoy the latest games – without hackers declaring ‘Game Over’.

Krysanec trojan: Android backdoor lurking inside legitimate apps

One of the most important pieces of advice we give Android users is to refrain from downloading applications from dubious sources and to stick to the official Google Play store, where malware does show up from time to time but is much better controlled, thanks to the Google Bouncer, than on alternative app stores.

Week in security: FBI malware, billion password leak – Chinese hotel goes mad

With Black Hat 2014 in full swing in Las Vegas, it was never going to be a quiet week – but revelations about FBI malware and a trove of a billion passwords inspired furious debate too.

Malware behind 25% of cyber attacks – and DoS is ‘so last year’ says CERT team

Cybercriminals are waging a game of ‘cat and mouse’ with corporations, well-armed with malware protection AV software but facing adversaries who scan constantly for weak points, according to the first quarterly report released by the UK’s new Computer Emergency Response Team.

Dark web II: Tor’s markets ramp up security – and business booms

Since a recent claim researchers could “uncloak” Tor users for less than $3,000, there has been a flurry of activity in the “anonymous” online service – but in the form of new adverts, new markets, and new security.

Malware is called malicious for a reason: the risks of weaponizing code

The risks of using government use of malicious code in cyber conflict are examined in this paper by Andrew Lee and Stephen Cobb: Malware is called malicious for a reason: the risks of weaponizing code.

Homeland Security warns of new Point of Sale attacks

New malware targeting point of sale (PoS) systems, detected by ESET as Win32/Spy.Agent.OKG is described in a warning and analysis distributed by US-CERT, a reminder to increase security around PoS access.

Week in Security: Tor in turmoil, USB ports in a storm, Android app attack

This week in security news saw the world’s researchers discover a whole new range of Achilles Heels for PCs, the online privacy service Tor, and even ‘connected’ gadgets such as internet fridges.

Malware: Every USB port is “defenseless” against new scam

The billions of USB ports in use in PCs are vulnerable to a new attack – which can undetectably install malware, steal data and seize control of machines.

World of Warcraft account hacked – should thieves face jail?

Account hackers and thieves who loot magic weapons, armor and hard-won game currency from players in massively multiplayer titles such as World of Warcraft should face the same sentences as real-world thieves, a politician has suggested.

Insider threat – should you worry about the ‘enemy within’?

Disgruntled employees and other malicious insiders could be one of the most serious security threats companies face – but the importance of the threat from the ‘enemy within’ varies according to who you ask.

Hacked Japanese porn sites spread banking malware attack

Thinking of spending some time perusing Japanese porn websites before you do your online banking? Security researchers at ESET have analysed an organised malware campaign that stole the login credentials of online banking customers after infecting PCs that had visited X-rated websites.

Win32/Aibatook: Banking Trojan Spreading Through Japanese Adult Websites

Win32/Aibatook targets Japanese bank customers with an unusual Internet Explorer monitoring technique. We believe the malware has been in development for months – and is now ready for take-off.

Google Chrome security warnings – now in plain English

“Phishing attack ahead” is similar to the stark, clear warnings delivered by road signs – and web users will soon benefit from this sort of plain-speaking alert, at least when using Google’s Chrome browser.

Keylogger malware in hotel business centers – should you worry?

Guests who used business centers in American hotels may be at risk from gangs installing keylogger malware on the computers to steal banking and email passwords.

Banking malware Shylock’s servers knocked out by law enforcement

A notorious strain of banking malware, known as Caphaw – or Shylock, due to snippets of Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice embedded in its code – has seen its command and control servers shut down in a major international police operation.

Copyright emails ‘poisoned with Trojan’

Emails warning internet users that they have violated copyright and owe companies such as Sony and Paramount a cash settlement have been circulating widely in Germany – but the shock tactic is a scam.

Brazilian payment malware may have skimmed up to $4 billion

Banking malware built to misdirect a Brazilian form of bank payment method targeted $3.75 billion of transactions over the past two years – and the scale of the attack may have eclipsed any single previous instance of electronic theft.

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