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Malware

Small businesses are new target for criminals as attacks double, report warns

The assault by cybercriminals against big businesses continued this year -78% were attacked by outsiders, according to a report by Price Waterhouse Cooper. But small businesses – those with less than 50 employees – are rapidly becoming a target.

NSA saves world from plot to “remotely destroy” PCs, claims NSA director

An international plot which would have turned huge numbers of PCs into “bricks” by using deeply buried malware was foiled by the NSA, according to an interview given to CBS by NSA director Keith Alexander. The attack could have “taken down the U.S. economy”, an NSA official claimed.

11 things you can do to protect against ransomware, including Cryptolocker

11 things you can be doing to better protect your computers and data from ransomware such as Cryptolocker that is currently targeting businesses big and small.

All of Android’s top 100 apps have been hacked – and banking apps are now a prime target, report finds

All of the top 100 apps on Google’s Play store have been hacked, and hackers now specifically target financial apps, such as those used by banks – with 53% of Android banking apps having been cracked, according to a report by Arxan.

New Hesperbot targets: Germany and Australia

In September we informed about a new banking trojan called Hesperbot (detected as Win32/Spy.Hesperbot). The perpetrators responsible for the threat are still active – November has been particularly eventful. In this post, we’ll give an update on the situation and malware developments.

FBI hacker teams have watched through PC webcams “for years”, court hears

The FBI custom-designs malware to snare suspects, a court has heard, and has been able “for years” to watch suspects through PC webcams, a court has heard. The teams operate “like normal hackers” – and rely on phishing and other criminal techniques.

Phantom menace? A guide to APTs – and why most of us have little to fear from these ‘cyberweapons’

APTs – or Advanced Persistent Threats – are the most menacing cyber attack there is, some say. Built to be stealthy, they penetrate networks, steal secrets – and vanish. ‘Catching’ one was a little like finding Bigfoot – but the much-hyped threat wasn’t quite so scary up close…

Will car-hacking be the “next global cybercrime”? Senator’s letter inspires debate

As wireless technologies and electronic controls are increasingly built into cars, vehicles could become vulnerable to hackers – either stealing information, or injecting malware, a U.S. Senator warned – inspiring debate on how real this threat is.

Microsoft’s new crime-fighting super-team strikes blow against million-strong “zombie army”

Only weeks after Microsoft unveiled a global Cybercrime Center armed with new, hi-tech tools to combat crime, it announced it had carried out a global action leading to “significant disruption” of the Siferef botnet, a network controlling up to two million “zombie” PCs.

Did you say “Advanced” Persistent Threats?

Once in a while we get to spend time analyzing malicious code that is not as widespread as other threats we’ve encountered. Here we analyze a targeted attack used in Taiwan and Vietnam – but is this ‘APT’ really that advanced?

Has-bean? Old Androids still on Jelly Bean can be “lock-picked” by malware

A vulnerability in Android could allow attackers to “unlock” phones without cracking PIN codes – using malware to deactivate Google’s locks on handsets and tablets. The vulnerability can “turn off” all locks a user puts in place.

Ultrasonic cyber-attack can “steal information” even from high-security systems, researchers warn

An audio communication system designed for ultrasonic underwater communications can be used to steal data – even from disconnected PCs in secure environments, by relaying it to the outside world from PC to PC through computer speakers, researchers claim.

Spy agencies working on cyberweapon “more powerful than Stuxnet”, claims Iran

An Iranian news agency has said that “malware worse than Stuxnet” may soon be unleashed, to “spy on and destroy the software structure of Iran’s nuclear program”.

When malware goes bad: an historical sampler

A look back at malware failures, malicious code that did not work out as well as the folks behind it had hoped. Can malware spread to quickly for its own good? Can malware authors ever test their wares well enough to work perfectly?

Filecoder epidemic goes global as Australians among “millions” of victims worldwide

Filecoder, an unpleasant and virulent strain of ransomware is now spreading globally, with experts estimating that the gang behind it must be earning “millions”. The surging value of Bitcoin may be helping the criminals, experts say.

PC gaming service fined $1m for serving up Bitcoin-mining malware

The company, E-Sports Entertainment, served up malware which used PCs to mine Bitcoins, an attack which earned $3,602. The malware was delivered surreptitiously alongside the company’s official client.

Graham Cluley: AV shouldn’t just be something on your hard drive – it should be part of a global immune system

In the first of a series of guest blog posts AV industry veteran Graham Cluley voices his opinion on how security has changed – and the changes we all need to make for the future.

Chronology of a Skype attack

By the middle of May, users around the world started to receive messages from their contacts through different instant-messaging applications, such as Skype and Gtalk – an attack that showed off how age-old techniques can ensnare thousands of users. Here, we analyze this attack.

“Tens of millions” at risk from Filecoder due to “mass email spam event” targeting small businesses, British police agency warns

Tens of millions of computer users are at risk from Filecoder due to a “mass spamming event”, detailed in an alert from Britain’s National Cyber Crime Unit, which is targeting small businesses with a spam campaign.

ESET response to Bits of Freedom open letter on detection of government malware

A coalition of digital rights organizations and academics recently published an ‘open letter’ to the Anti-Malware/Anti-Virus industry asking for clarification on vendor policies regarding cooperation with government agencies and/or law enforcement using state-sponsored Trojans. This is ESET’s official response.

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