iPhone

IBot revisited (briefly)

I don't want to flog (or blog) this iPhone bot thing to death: after all, the number of potential victims should be shrinking all the time. However, having updated my previous blog (http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/2009/11/22/ibot-mark-2-go-straight-to-jail-do-not-pass-go)  on the topic a couple of times, I thought I'd actually go to a new blog rather than insert update 3. So here are the update bits

iBot Mark 2: Go Straight To Jail Do Not Pass Go

[Update, courtesy of Mikko: this worm targets at least one Dutch bank, and activates when users go to the online bank with an infected iPhone ] [Update 2, courtesy of Paul Ducklin: how to change the password of an infected phone. I could just tell you what the password is, but you might want to read

When is a worm not a worm?

Will No-One Rid Me Of This Turbulent Hacker Tool? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Becket) I was kind of hoping to have moved on from the iPhone data stealing hacker tool by now. While I do think it's a significant development (see http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/2009/11/12/iphone-hack-tool-a-postscript), there comes a point where the sheer volume of discussion of the subject gives it more importance

iPhone Hack Tool: a Postscript

Update: there's more information on the Windows 7 exploit mentioned below in a Register article at http://reg.cx/1FcX. Update 2: I keep seeing references to this as a virus or worm. However, the code I've seen does not contain any self-replicative functionality. It's not even a Trojan, as such. Following an extract from one of my

iPhone/Privacy.A: a bit more info

In my previous blog on this topic (http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/2009/11/11/hacker-tool-exploits-vulnerability-in-jailbroken-iphones), I said that I didn't know if this hacking tool worked under Windows as well as OSX/Unix and Linux. I've subsequently exchanged email with Philippe Devallois at Intego, who tells me (thanks, Philippe!) that in principle, it will work fine with Windows. It's written in Python (as

Hacker tool exploits vulnerability in jailbroken iPhones

I don't really want to keep banging on about jailbroken iPhones when there are threats out there that affect many more people (though according to Intego, 6-8% of iPhones are, in fact, jailbroken, so I don't want to minimize the threat either). I'm quoting Intego because they've just blogged (http://blog.intego.com/2009/11/11/intego-security-memo-hacker-tool-copies-personal-info-from-iphones/) what I think is a

ikee iPhone iWorm iSource: iYukkkkk!!!!

Inevitably, the source code for the ikee worm I mentioned in a previous blog (http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/2009/11/10/iworm-ikee-sex-and-drugs-and-rick-and-roll) has crept back out from under its rock. It's probably equally inevitable that there'll be more script-kiddy attempts to produce variants and it will be easier for heavy-duty malware creators to produce new malware using similar techniques, if they're so-minded. If you

iWorm ikee: Sex and Drugs and Rick and Roll

The iPhone, it seems, is under siege: a recent worm exploits a known (and previously exploited) vulnerability that affects the owners of "jailbroken" phones on which OpenSSH has been installed. (Jailbreaking allows iPhone users to install and use unapproved applications.) Of course, there's been an enormous amount of media coverage on this already (I've just

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23 Nov 2009
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