Hacking

How’s your cyber security awareness? Or, do we really need security training?

As you may know, October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month in America, which is a good time to ask yourself how aware you are when it comes to threats to your digital devices and personal information.

Blizzard Entertainment hacked this time for real (lessons learned)

In May we read that game maker Blizzard, developer of a series of popular games including World of Warcraft, Diablo III and Starcraft, was hacked, but that turned out to just be individual compromised accounts from some of its users. Now we read, from Blizzard itself rather than a third party, that they have been

Authentication attacks: Apple, Amazon, iCloud, Google, anything with a password

Sharing details of the hack that “wiped his life” has earned Mat Honan a place in the annals of information system security; the specific inter-dependence of flawed authentication systems that cost him so dearly–encompassing Apple, iCloud, Amazon.com, Gmail and more–would probably still exist if Mat had not gone public. Wired has the full story here

Gamigo game site hack lessons learned (and what should you do)

Gamigo learned a few months ago about a breach and alerted its users that they had been attacked. But now, we see an estimated 8+ million records just went public, no small amount for the attackers. What is interesting is that by one account, hash cracking was able to decrypt over 90% of the passwords,

You've Got (Nation State Hacked) Mail

We read in the New York Times that Google is rolling out a service that will attempt to alert users when it thinks their accounts might be subject to hacking by a government, hoping the user will take precautions after getting a notice that says “Warning: We believe state-sponsored attackers may be attempting to compromise

Could hackers break into your Wi-Fi wireless router?

You just got a new wireless router for Christmas, but when you set it up it asks about wireless security. Do you want WEP, WPA, WPA2 or any of the other alphabet soup options they give? While it’s easiest to just pick the default setting, are you setting yourself up for trouble from aspiring hackers?

Stratfor hack – lessons learned

Recently we noted that unencrypted credit card storage was on the rise in 2011, and also highlighted the expense involved to the company in the event of a credit card breach. Now we see personal data – including unencrypted credit card information – being paraded out as a part of the recent Stratfor hack. Also,

Android vulnerability patch time lag causes malware opportunity

One of the blessings of Open Source initiatives is the rapidity with which coders can release quality collaborative code. This is one of the ways the Android managed to claw its way into the smartphone mainstream, after arriving late to the game. But as the app ecosystem matures, vulnerability/patch management becomes more of an issue,

Should you hire a hacker to prevent data breaches?

With all the recent headlines about data breaches, should your organization hire a “thief to catch a thief?” That’s a question Kevin Mitnick, sitting near the top of the hacker hall-of-fame for famous hack sprees in decades past, has been contemplating. He’s not alone – many companies are wondering the same thing. There is a

Hack wireless industrial sensors in a few easy steps

On the heels of the recent activity with Stuxnet, the industrial process control computer worm that targeted Iranian nuclear centrifuges, a Blackhat talk by Thanassis Giannetsos explains how to hack yet another commonly used family of controllers. We have mused that this trend, targeting critical infrastructure nodes, is but a shade of things yet to

Hacktivism: not a get-out-of-jail card?

What we’re lacking here is a clear differentiation between types of “hacktivist” or, indeed, “activist”: much of the commentary that’s around at the moment seems to assume that all hacktivists are the same.

50 ways to hack a website

Well, really there are far more, but the latest study from Imperva of 10 million attacks against 30 large organizations from January to May of 2011 cites a cocktail of techniques used by would-be hackers to spot the weaknesses and exploit them. For those of us who’ve tailed a log file spinning out of control

Stuxnet: Broke Iranian nuclear centrifuges?

Or so the latest report from DEBKAfile states, claiming the Stuxnet worm broke numerous Iranian centrifuges by forcing them to overspeed, causing damage and prompting the replacement of some 5,000-6,000 units. They cite “intelligence sources” as the source of information. Whether or not this will be confirmed, it seems malware authors clearly are targeting political

‘Anonymous’ NATO data breach?

2 days ago, the FBI announced a series of raids resulting in arrests of alleged members of the hacking group ‘Anonymous’. Hoping to deal a critical blow to the organization, they swept up more than a few potential members, and a tidy stash of computers to boot. So we’re done with ‘Anonymous’, right? Today, we

Arizona DPS: hacked again – still – really?

On Wednesday we heard additional documents had been leaked from the Arizona Department of Public Safety (DPS). “Will this ever end?” has to be the most commonly-asked question in Arizona nowadays at the DPS. The original attacks last week were claimed by the group LulzSec, which was making the rounds exposing private information through hacking

Got Hacked? You have 48 hours to fess up

Or so the current legislation being proposed in a U.S. House of Representative subcommittee would like it. A hearing scheduled for today at the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade Subcommittee centered around draft legislation proposed by Rep. Mary Bono Mack (R-Calif.) hoping to accomplish a security baseline companies must adhere to,

I Can Neither Confirm nor Deny

As website appear to fall to hacks like the rain falls in Seattle, the question du jour doesn’t change from day to day. The same question is always asked… “Did Anonymous perform the attack?” What do all of these links below have in common? You don’t have to read them, I’ll tell you.. http://sdchamber-members.org/Business%20Online%202009-10/Business%20Action%20Online%20May%202010/Business%20Action%20Online%20May%20ESET.html http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/03/17/scientology_anonymous_round_three/

LulzSec lulls the NHS: not such bad lads?

…on the Twitter account owned by LulzSec that they had turned their attention to the NHS. Curiously enough, they seem to have been restrained and even responsible: while there’s an image out there of a message they claim to have sent to an administrator at an unidentified NHS site, they blacked out the details.

North Korea’s Overseas Cyber Warrior Training

It appears North Korea is expanding their cyber warrior savvy in a plan that includes sending the best and brightest of young programmers abroad to bone up on hacking, with the alleged goal of holding their own in cyber warfare. On the heels of the recent Pentagon announcement where cyber terrorism acts may be met

An ethical dilemma

Update: It seems like the initial article is inaccurate and that Paul Rellis never made any such comments about a 14 year old breaking into the X-Box live servers and have not offered to mentor him http://kotaku.com/5805742/microsoft-is-helping-an-xbox-live-hacker-develop-his-talent TekGoblin reports (http://www.tekgoblin.com/2011/05/27/14-year-old-call-of-duty-hacker-hired-by-microsoft/) that a teenager who broke into the Call of Duty Modern Warfare 2 gameservers last

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