DNS

DNSChanger: lies, damn' lies and telemetry statistics

First the panic, then the accusations of hype. Can we really estimate the impact of DNSchanger yet?

DNSChanger mini-FAQ

Some brief answers to questions about the server shutdown that will affect tens/hundreds of thousands of DNSChanger victims on 9th July.

DNSChanger temporary’ DNS servers go dark soon: is your computer really fixed?

DNSChanger, a piece of malware that re-routed vast swathes of Internet traffic through rogue DNS servers after users became infected, was shut down by the FBI late last year. But simply shutting down the servers altogether would have ‘broken’ many hundreds of thousands of computers still infected–rendering it difficult for them to get help via

DNS Changer (re)lived, new deadline: 9 July 2012!

As written in our “Password management for non-obvious accounts” blog post on February 22, the FBI confiscated the DNS Servers used by the DNS Changer malware and replaced them with different servers so that infected users would not be left without internet right away. Initially these replacement DNS Servers were to be taken offline on

Password management for non-obvious accounts

A continuation on: Time to check your DNS settings? After 7 March 2012, lots of people potentially can be hit as their systems are infected by a DNS Changer. Several government-CERTs have already warned their users. Rather than using the ISP’s DNS Servers, the malware has changed the settings to use DNS Servers controlled by

Beware of SOPA Scams

Tomorrow, on January 18, 2012, dozens of popular websites covering a diverse range of subjects will be blacking out their home pages in protest of the U.S. Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA).  Some of these websites are well-known, such as the English language web site for the encyclopedic Wikipedia and quirky news site Boing Boing,

Secure DNS? Encrypt the last mile

DNSSEC has been making the headlines lately as a possible defense against nasty DNS redirection schemes on the server end. Combined with anti-malware efforts at thwarting DNS changing via malicious registry/host file modification, it’s making a dent. Now OpenDNS is proposing a last mile approach called DNSCrypt which intends to secure the problematic link between users’

SOPA-rific: House Judiciary Committee gets a rude awakening

SOPA: Homeland Security weighs in, MPAA is reticent. Clearly, the House Judiciary Committee needs some authoritative, neutral advice on the mechanics and implications of DNS filtering.

SOPA and PIPA and DNS: An open letter to Congress

SOPA and PIPA are pieces of legislation currently under consideration in the United States Congress that have serious implications for DNS, the Domain Name System which makes possible the Internet as we know it. To give them their full names these bills are HR 3261, the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), and S.968, the Preventing

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09 Jul 2012
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