category
credit card fraud

Online Shopping and a Phishing Pheeding Phrenzy [2]

Phishing scams and online shopping. Part 2 of a three-part article on phishing scams old and new, and some of the ways to recognize the baited hook.

Close call with a Caribbean cruise line scam

In the middle of working on a blog post about SMS phishing scams at my desk last night, I received a rather strange call.  The number displayed on the Caller ID was +1 (360) 474-3925.  I did not recognize the number, but since it was 7:10PM, I assumed it was a colleague trying to reach

SMSmishing Unabated: Best Buy targeted by fake gift card campaign

News of SMS (text) phishing scams are nothing new to readers of this blog.  ESET researcher Cameron Camp recently wrote an article explaining how they work and how to avoid them here on ESET’s Threat Blog: SMSmishing (SMS Text Phishing) – how to spot and avoid scams, And just before Valentine’s Day, my colleague Stephen

Press One if by LAN, Two if by Sea

At ESET, we spend a great deal of time researching the latest technologies and how they may be affected by frauds and scams. Sometimes these are “old fashioned” spam through email, or they may be programs like fake antivirus programs or ransomware. And we certainly have blogged extensively about PC support scams where the caller

Phishing Using HTML and Intranet Security Settings

Phishers always try to find new ways to bypass security features and trick ‘educated’ users. Over the years we have seen simplistic phishing attempts where the required information had to be typed into the e-mail body. This worked at that time because phishing was new and hardly anyone had a notion of the implications. Later,

Zappos.com breach – lessons learned

We read that Zappos.com was breached on Sunday, to the tune of 24+ million users’ worth of information. But it seems at first blush they responded well. Of course, a company would hope to never have a breach at all, but when it happened at Zappos.com, here are some of the things they appear to

Merchants push back on credit card breach fines

We've noted the often staggering fees associated with a credit card breach, normally accompanied by a slew of bad press. We've seen Stratfor, in light of their recent hack, dealing with public exposure issues due, in part, to unencrypted payment card information (for which, to their credt, they’ve publicly apologized for). Now we see a

Passwords, Stratfor, and Newton’s 3rd Law of Motion

Dazzlepod is saying … if your account name comes up, change your current password … why not assume that your account is compromised and go ahead and change it anyway and everywhere?

Stratfor hack – lessons learned

Recently we noted that unencrypted credit card storage was on the rise in 2011, and also highlighted the expense involved to the company in the event of a credit card breach. Now we see personal data – including unencrypted credit card information – being paraded out as a part of the recent Stratfor hack. Also,

What would a credit card breach cost your company?

We’ve noted recently that many companies store credit card information in an unencrypted form, sometimes several years' worth. So what happens if your systems get hacked before you get around to securing that credit card data? Sure, there’s the embarrassment of telling your customers their data has been exposed–a legal requirement in more than 40

Unencrypted credit card storage on the rise

More websites stored unencrypted credit card payment information than ever this year, according to a recent report. I thought we had this figured out? Obviously this is a direct violation of Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) requirements. But seriously, this stuff is simple for the developers to fix, so why don’t they?

High tech identity theft ring largest in U.S. history

“Operation Swiper” just busted the largest theft ring of its type in U.S. history. The $13 million dollar crime ring was exposed after a 2 year investigation by the New York City Police, primarily centering around selling Apple electronics overseas, according to Reuters. New York City Police Raymond Kelly said at a press conference “The

Skimming for Beginners

Regrettably, pretty much anything could happen to your credit card while it’s out of your sight. However, the “ATM Card Skimming and PIN capturing Awareness Guide”, while it can’t cover every possible permutation of illicit additives to your friendly local ATM, does at least offer some guidance as to what to look for.

Paying for free software

Adobe 0-days are not the only way in which you can be bitten by a PDF.

PIN Money

Further to an earlier blog about the "broken" Chip & PIN credit card security system (strictly speaking, the primary problem described is with EMV), it's noticeable that, as John Leyden puts it, "Industry groups [have] leap[t] to Chip and PIN's defence." In fact, the response has been a bit more mixed than that. But there

It Really Wasn’t Your Fault

You may have seen a headline about a huge identity theft ring being busted. http://www.reuters.com/article/topNews/idUSTRE57G4GC20090817 There are a lot of things people can do to be safer online, but in this case it wasn’t about your computer being hacked. Whenever you use a credit card or a debit card there is information that can potentially

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31 Oct 2012
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