confidentiality

Sharing versus Security: Driving without Brakes

Does the enterprise still have a choice about sharing information?

Guarding against password reset attacks with pen and paper

With the recent announcements of password breaches at LinkedIn, and warnings from Google about state-sponsored attacks on Gmail accounts, it seems like a good idea now to review some password security basics.  In this blog post, we’re going to take a look at a rather low-tech solution to a decidedly high-tech problem:  How to guard

Iranian TOR arms race a shadow of things to come?

Recently, the anonymizing network system TOR (The Onion Router) found its traffic was ratcheted to a standstill in Iran, prompting a comparison by one of the TOR project developers to an emerging “arms race”. Users of the service, hoping to evade state censorship/snooping, encrypt the traffic that then gets routed anonymously around the globe. But

WikiLeaks 2.0 – a new kid in town

Following the plight of the oft-storied WikiLeaks organization, we see a new variant to hit the streets soon, GlobaLeaks. Apparently WikiLeaks has garnered a bit of a following with the community, along with the attraction of a fair share of consternation from governments around the world. This new effort attempts to extend that further. Law

Facebook Facial Recognition – A picture is worth a thousand words

Facebook recently launched a facial recognition feature that allows you and others to “tag” photos with your name. As has been the norm for Facebook, this “feature” is turned on by default and users must take their own initiative to limit, or turn it off. The implications are wide-ranging, so if you or anyone in

Unencrypted Wireless: In Like a Lion, Out Like a Lamb

[C. Nicholas Burnett, the manager for ESET LLC's tier three technical support, contributed the following guest blog article on the FireSheep plugin for Firefox.  Thank you very much, Carl!  Aryeh Goretsky] The past several days have seen the security community abuzz about a program presented in San Diego at ToorCon 12 this last weekend called

Facebook checked out, 1.5 million accounts overdue for password changes?

The Internet is abuzz with the announcement from Verisign’s iDefense Labs that a criminal hacker on a Russian forum who goes by the nom-de-plume "Kirllos" (Carlos?) is selling the credentials for 1.5 million Facebook accounts in batches of a thousand for between $8 and $30, depending upon their quality (which, in this case, means dates

The Internet Book of the Dead

This blog is a bit of an oddity. ESET UK were approached by Dan Damon, a reporter putting together a piece about “the complications of a digital world when someone passes away”, asking if there was someone at ESET who would be interested in being interviewed for BBC1 radio on the subject. The request got

Turkish Delight

So, back in harness. I’ve been away for a couple of weeks: not on holiday as such, though I did take some days out, but concentrating on writing: it didn’t hurt that I didn’t have a full-strength internet connection to distract me, though. Before I left, I was interviewed by a Turkish security site. It

Blackberry Sundae

Having worked quite a lot in recent years in the public sector in the UK, I’m not at all surprised that RIM (Research in Motion) is bullish about being assessed by CESG as suitable for use with restricted government data. However, it’s not altogether clear from the documentation published by RIM what this actually means.

T-Mobile Data Breach – Or Not…

Just last Saturday, June 6th; there was a new posting on the Full Disclosure mailing list from a source that calls themselves pwnmobile (at least that’s part of their email address). In the post, pwnmobile claims they have harvested information from T-Mobile USA’s servers. The data they claim to have acquired is: various databases confidential

HIPAA is not privacy

Many people in the US associate HIPAA with the rules required to protect medical data. It actually is a lot more than that, but the HIPAA laws do require some minimal standards for medical providers. I recently came across an example of where HIPAA is ineffective. The medical providers are required to protect your data,

Protection Part 7

If sensitive information is stored on your hard drive (and if you don’t have -something- worth protecting on your system, you’re probably not reading this blog…), protect it with encryption. Furthermore, when you copy or move data elsewhere, it’s usually at least as important to protect/encrypt it when it’s on removable media, or transferred electronically.

10 Ways to Protect Yourself: Part 6

Don’t disclose sensitive information on public websites like FaceBook or LinkedIn. Even information that in itself is innocuous can be combined with other harmless information and used in social engineering attacks. Rather than expand on that point, for now, I’m going to point to another "10 ways to protect yourself" resource: the more good advice

10 Ways to Protect Yourself: Part 5

Don’t trust unsolicited files or embedded links, even from friends. It’s easy to spoof email addresses, for instance, so that email appears to come from someone other than the real sender (who/which may in any case be a spam tool rather than a human being). Basic SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) doesn’t validate the sender’s

%$^& is Fine for Cussing, But Not a Great Password

We’re closing in on the end of 2008 and about to start 7D9, or 2009 for those who do not speak hex. I thought it might be a good time to remind you to change your passwords. There are some important things to remember about passwords. Despite the IT policies that are prevalent throughout the

(One out of) Ten Ways to Dodge Cyber-Bullets

It’s that time of year when everyone wants a top ten: the top ten most stupid remarks made by celebrities, the ten worst-dressed French poodles, the ten most embarrassing political speeches, and so on. Our research team came up with a few rather more serious ideas, most of which are considered at some length in our about-to-be-published

Cybercrime and Punishment, and a little Cryptanalysis…

Well, not so much about punishment, but I’m sitting in the lounge with Andrew Davies’s version of Dr. Zhivago in the background, so I’m in a Russian mood… My colleague Jeff Debrosse, Director of Research in our San Diego office, drew my attention to the latest FBI challenge at http://www.fbi.gov/page2/dec08/code_122908.html. Like many people in this

Data Leakage, Politics, the Universe and Everything…

There is no way of eliminating the risk of data loss completely because systems, however good they are, are implemented, administered and used by human beings.

Google Chrome May be the Wrong Choice

After having used the Google Chrome internet browser for a while now, I can say that it is generally a pretty nice browser, but I have some very serious privacy concerns.

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24 Jun 2012
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