category
civil rights

Iranian TOR arms race a shadow of things to come?

Recently, the anonymizing network system TOR (The Onion Router) found its traffic was ratcheted to a standstill in Iran, prompting a comparison by one of the TOR project developers to an emerging “arms race”. Users of the service, hoping to evade state censorship/snooping, encrypt the traffic that then gets routed anonymously around the globe. But

Anonymous and the Megaupload Aftermath: Hacktivism or Just Plain Ugly?

Yesterday’s announcement by the US Department of Justice that the operators of file-sharing site Megaupload had been indicted for operating a criminal enterprise that generated over $175 million by trafficking in over half a billion dollars of pirated copyrighted material has sent shockwaves across the Internet. The accuracy of those figures may be questionable, but

2012 predictions: online data brokers come under fire

In 2011 we saw an increase concern about, and scrutiny of, what exactly social networking sites do with the data you input, both internally as well as what gets shared with third parties. But in 2012 some of that scrutiny will shift to those third parties as more people ask: What are they doing with

How secure is TSA? Congress isn’t impressed

In a scathing and far-reaching US Congressional report released recently the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was characterized in these unflattering terms: “Since its inception, TSA has lost its focus on transportation security. Instead, it has grown into an enormous, inflexible and distracted bureaucracy, more concerned with human resource management and consolidating power, and acting reactively

Holiday shopping? We know where you are

Well, not you exactly you, but malls are rolling out technology that tracks customers’ patterns throughout the mall using cell signals. They say they aren’t collecting personal information, but say they want to be able to track customer traffic patterns, for example, how many customers visit Starbucks after visiting Nordstroms. The technology, called FootPath, is

US Pentagon: it’s official, military response to cyber attacks

Awhile back we noticed signals from the US Pentagon that they were considering the possibility of a traditional military response to cyber attacks on US physical infrastructure. Basically, a cyber attack on infrastructure could be considered an act of war. We now see the official report released, confirming this. The report states, “When warranted, we

Which anonymizing VPN is really anonymous?

On the heels of the arrest of Cory Kretsinger, aka “Recursion”, for one of the Sony data breaches, following an FBI request for traffic records from his VPN provider, users wonder whether anonymizing service providers really are all that anonymous. Using a VPN to connect securely out of reach of prying eyes, is a common

Rig an election for around 25 bucks

Actually $26, according to a study conducted by Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois, which was able to hack a Diebold voting machine with “about $26 and an 8th-grade science education.” In light of the rapidly approaching 2012 U.S. Presidential Election, it seems there may be a need to give serious attention to securing our election

Senate cybersecurity bill one step closer to law

This morning we recorded a podcast posing the question “can legislation solve cybercrime?” Well, The Senate Judiciary Committee seems eager to play a part, passing a measure yesterday attempting to thwart computer attacks. Measure S.1151 sets a national standard for data breach notification, replacing the various state initiatives already in place. It also makes concealing

Google your own health record?

Is that possible? Well, a researcher with Identity Finder, Aaron Titus, believes so, since he says he managed to use internet searches to unearth a trove of unsecured private health records on a website, around 300,000 of them. He notified the company, Southern California Medical-Legal Consultants, which represents doctors and hospitals seeking payment from patients

Social-networking to blame for social unrest?

We see this morning a post about British Prime Minister Cameron’s assertion yesterday during a Parliament presentation that, “Free flow of information can be used for good. But it can also be used for ill. And when people are using social media for violence, we need to stop them.” Sort of hearkens back to the

Arizona DPS: hacked again – still – really?

On Wednesday we heard additional documents had been leaked from the Arizona Department of Public Safety (DPS). “Will this ever end?” has to be the most commonly-asked question in Arizona nowadays at the DPS. The original attacks last week were claimed by the group LulzSec, which was making the rounds exposing private information through hacking

Government hackers hit al-Qaida?

Al-Qaida appears to have had its web communications hit by hackers, thwarting its continued effort at updating the world about its activities. It appears that a good portion of their global web presence has been affected. A year ago a similar style attack halted their web communications. According to Evan Kohlmann from Flashpoint Global Partners,

North Korea’s Overseas Cyber Warrior Training

It appears North Korea is expanding their cyber warrior savvy in a plan that includes sending the best and brightest of young programmers abroad to bone up on hacking, with the alleged goal of holding their own in cyber warfare. On the heels of the recent Pentagon announcement where cyber terrorism acts may be met

Real War – The Next Cyber Frontier

Cyber Security pundits have been keenly watching the development of nascent state targeted attacks such as the Stuxnet worm with interest for some time and warning of the possible implications, but now it’s official. According to The Wall Street Journal, “The Pentagon’s first formal cyber strategy, unclassified portions of which are expected to become public

Conroy’s Folly

For about 18 months now, the Australian government has been planning to spend over A$40 million on a compulsory national Internet filter. This filter seems to have come about as a result of a few very conservative and naive people talking into the ear of Stephen Conroy, the Federal Minister for Broadband, Communications and Digital

Is All Lost?

Today is inauguration day in the USA. As I traveled to many countries late last year I was amazed at how joyous people of many cultures were that Obama is to be President of the USA. Working in the security field, we see a lot of disappointment. Sometimes it seems that there is no hope

Magic Lantern Show in the UK?

Nigel Morris, of the UK’s "Independent" newspaper reported recently on new powers given to police in the UK and proposals to extend similar powers across the European Union. Understandably, civil rights groups like Liberty have apparently expressed the belief that such expansion of "police hacking operations" should be regulated by Act of Parliament and that there

Follow Us

Automatically receive new posts via email:

Delivered by FeedBurner

26 articles related to:
Hot Topic
ESET Virus Radar

Archives

Select month
Copyright © 2014 ESET, All Rights Reserved.