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Readers of popular websites targeted by stealthy Stegano exploit kit hiding in pixels of malicious ads

Millions of readers who visit popular news websites have been targeted by a series of malicious ads redirecting them to the Stegano exploit kit.

Cybercriminals target Brazilian routers with default credentials

Criminals are hunting for routers with default credentials and with vulnerabilities in their firmware, with Brazilians the main target.

OSX/Keydnap spreads via signed Transmission application

During the last hours, OSX/Keydnap was distributed on a trusted website, which turned out to be “something else”. It spread via a recompiled version of the otherwise legitimate open source BitTorrent client application Transmission and distributed on their official website.

Windows exploitation in 2015

Hacking Team exploits and new security features in Google Chrome and Microsoft Edge are just a few of the highlights of ESET’s annual Windows exploitation in 2015 report.

ESET predictions and trends for cybercrime in 2016

It’s that time of the year when the information security industry takes part in its annual tradition: coming up with cybercrime predictions and trends for the next 12 months.

Sednit APT Group Meets Hacking Team

The infamous Sednit espionage group is currently using the Hacking Team exploits disclosed earlier this week to target eastern European institutions.

Windows exploitation in 2014

Today, we published our research about Windows exploitation in 2014. This report contains interesting information about vulnerabilities in Microsoft Windows and Office patched over the course of the year, drive-by download attacks and mitigation techniques.

Cybercrime Trends & Predictions for 2015

As regular readers will know, every year we publish our predictions on cybercrime attacks for the year ahead. Well, our South American research team has spent the last few weeks putting together our predictions for 2015.

First exploitation of Internet Explorer ‘Unicorn bug’ in-the-wild

Microsoft released a patch last week for a critical vulnerability allowing remote code execution in Internet Explorer. This vulnerability is significant because it exploits an old bug present in Internet Explorer versions 3 through 11.

G20 2014 Summit Lure used to target Tibetan activists

APT actors trying to use big events as a lure to compromise their targets is nothing new. Tibetan NGOs being targeted by APT actors is also nothing new. Thus, surrounding the upcoming G20 2014 summit that is held in Brisbane, Australia, we were expecting to see G20 themed threats targeted at Tibetan NGOs. A Win32/Farfli (alias Gh0st RAT) sample ultimately confirmed our suspicions.

Sednit espionage group now using custom exploit kit

For at least five years the Sednit group has been relentlessly attacking various institutions, most notably in Eastern Europe. The group used several advanced pieces of malware for these targeted attacks, in particular the one we named Win32/Sednit, also known as Sofacy.

Gamescom 2014: World of Malware?

The gaming industry keeps growing, and the crowds at Cologne’s Gamescom 2014, show why big game titles are rapidly becoming a target for cybercrime. Our tips will help you enjoy the latest games – without hackers declaring ‘Game Over’.

Win32/Aibatook: Banking Trojan Spreading Through Japanese Adult Websites

Win32/Aibatook targets Japanese bank customers with an unusual Internet Explorer monitoring technique. We believe the malware has been in development for months – and is now ready for take-off.

Miniduke still duking it out

At the end of April Microsoft announced that a vulnerability in Word was actively being exploited. New variants of MiniDuke display interesting and novel features. Here, we take a closer look.

Windows exploitation in 2013

The year 2013 was notable for the appearance of 0-day vulnerabilities that were primarily used in targeted attacks. In this case, criminal hackers worked on developing exploits, only not for random propagation of malicious code, but rather for use in attacks on specific users.

Versatile and infectious: Win64/Expiro is a cross-platform file infector

Recently, our anti-virus laboratory discovered an interesting new modification of a file virus known as Expiro which targets 64-bit files for infection. File-infecting viruses are well known and have been studied comprehensively over the years, but malicious code of this type almost invariably aimed to modify 32-bit files. One such family of file viruses, called

Anonymous and the Megaupload Aftermath: Hacktivism or Just Plain Ugly?

Yesterday’s announcement by the US Department of Justice that the operators of file-sharing site Megaupload had been indicted for operating a criminal enterprise that generated over $175 million by trafficking in over half a billion dollars of pirated copyrighted material has sent shockwaves across the Internet. The accuracy of those figures may be questionable, but

October: Facebook Facepalm, Feeling Safe Online, and a Small Tsunami

ESET’s Threat Reports for September and October include some quality articles on Facebook, safety online, and backup strategy.

New Apple OS X Malware: Fake Adobe Flash Installer

A new attack against Apple Mac OS X Lion (10.7) has been detected by Intego. The threat is a Trojan, dubbed Flashback, installed via a fake Adobe Flash installer downloaded from a third party site. As with the MacDefender and Revir malware, the Flashback attack uses social engineering to entice the user to download then

PDF Trojan Appears on Mac OS X

  A new trojan has been released targeting the Macintosh Chinese-language user community.  The trojan appears to the user to be a PDF containing a Chinese language article on the long-running dispute over whether Japan or China owns the Diaoyu Islands.   When the user opens the “PDF” file, it attempts to mask the installation

Imitation is not always the sincerest form of flattery

Since its release in 2007, ESET Smart Security has received many accolades for its antimalware, antispam and firewall functions.  However, we have recently been the recipient of a very dubious honor; a rogue antivirus program which masquerades as our own software. The Rogues Gallery Rogue antivirus is a loose family of programs that claim to

Insider Threat: Malware on your ATM

  Insider Threat – your ATM may now be hacked from the inside. According to Wired’s Threat Level Blog… A Bank of America worker installed malicious software on his employer’s ATMs that allowed him to make thousands of dollars in fraudulent withdrawals, all without leaving a transaction record, according to federal prosecutors. According to the

Auto-Infect

PLEEEEASE Infect me This is what Windows says when you install it. You see, there is a default setting called “autorun” that will automatically run a program when you insert a CD or DVD or thumb drive into your computer. The idea is that you put the media in there to run a program, so

What’s a redirect and why is it bad?

A redirect is a way to take a web surfer to another site. Redirection is very useful when done right. Instead of getting an error message that the page cannot be found you can be redirected to a page that helps you find what you are looking for. At ESET we use redirects properly. If

Don’t Get Burned Twice

The current fires in Southern California are causing misery to hundreds of thousands of people. ESET LLC calls San Diego home and is acutely aware of the impact this is having on people’s lives. Not only is ESET providing assistance to employees impacted by the fire, but some employees are volunteering their time and money

Virus Bulletin – Vienna

Quite a while ago I posted a blog titled “The Spirit of Cooperation”  in which I spoke of the AVAR conference. Today I write from the Virus Bulletin conference. It could be my last blog if my boss finds out I’m writing a blog while he’s addressing us in a session at the conference :)

Beta Test This!

Well, I said I wasn’t going to post each time the storm gang changes their tactics, however, perhaps I can use many of their ploys to teach anti-scam education. The scum-scam du jour is an email asking you to beta test some software. One I saw went as follows: ———————————————————————————————— Would you consider helping us

Wow, a bulletproof vest!

Our heuristics have gotten pretty well tuned to the varieties of Storm Worms we’re seeing. We generally catch the new variants, but nobody is catching them all without incurring a significant false positive rate. There are probably some companies that would take issue, but when you block everything, including good, that counts as false positives

Is Everyone Really Bad?

Most of us were taught that most people are good and only a few are bad. This truism has carried over to computers where it is not applicable, especially in the case of email. It isn’t that there are more bad computer users than good ones though. Here’s how it works. If you have 100

Yahoo Messenger Vulnerability

Vulnerability in Yahoo Messenger that can potentially allow a remote attacker to hijack your PC is you accept a webcam invite. Of course, your friends are not going to exploit the flaw when they invite you to a video chat. The threat is when you get invites from untrusted sources. The obvious advice is to

Sugar Pill

WARNING! The following post contains examples of humor and satire. If you do not find this funny there is probably a pill for that too. We’ve seen Red Pill (http://invisiblethings.org/papers/redpill.html). We’ve seen Blue Pill (http://theinvisiblethings.blogspot.com/2006/06/introducing-blue-pill.html). Today I read about Purple Pill (http://blogs.zdnet.com/security/?p=427) and so I have decided to pre-emptively warn you about Sugar Pill. Sugar

You Have To Try Hard To Be Less Competent

So the people at untangle.com decide to “test” anti-virus product in an effort to prove their dedication to open source zealousness. I’m not against open source, but if you want to promote it then be honest about it. First untangle grabs a few samples of “viruses” that they know CLAM AV will detect. Unfortunately 1

eOops

Ok, now I’m in trouble. It seems that about the time of my post about eVil eCards and eVites our sales department was just about to use an eVite. Actually, for their intended purpose an eVite may well be the right tool for the job. How’s that you ask? The answer is context and clear

Why eCards, eVites, eGreetings, and such are eVil

There are a number of reasons why people should not send or read eCards and the like. I am hard pressed to think of any reasons why people should send them though. So, how about a list of reasons why you should not send or open them. 1) Social Engineering. E-ware, as I collectively call

Twisted advice

CISRT issued an advisory about an IM worm. This is a typical worm that you avoid quite simply by not opening attachments in IM, especially when they claim to be Paris Hilton Videos. There is nothing particularly interesting about the worm, but there is something interesting about the write up at http://www.cisrt.org/enblog/read.php?128. CISRT gives instructions

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