Author
Rob Waugh
Rob Waugh
Independent Correspondent

Highlights of your career? Interviewing one of the team that broke the Enigma code.

What malware do you hate the most? The Love Bug - I was the guy who opened it.

Favorite activities? Testing smartphones (I often have three or more on the go).

When did you get your first computer and what kind was it? 1984, ZX Spectrum.

Favorite computer game/activity? World of Warcraft - but I gave up, and have been 'clean' for two years.

More Info

Wi-Fi password – “one second” hack allows attackers into many routers

A push-button function on many wireless routers designed to bypass the Wi-Fi password and provide quick access to the network could allow attackers to break in in “one second”, reports have claimed.

Week in Security: Game over in Korea, cellphone snoops and phishy Bitcoins

Gamers and cellphone users were targeted by criminal groups around the world this week – while retailers continued to suffer at the hands of POS malware, and a phishing campaign highlighted just how hot Bitcoin is right now.

Internet privacy: Seven rules to keep secrets safe

You are never truly invisible online – and even if you equip yourself with an arsenal of privacy tools, you’ll still be watched. But there are ways to ensure that you and your business never “overshare”. Here’s seven of them.

Android security mystery – ‘fake’ cellphone towers found in U.S.

Seventeen mysterious cellphone towers have been found in America which can only be identified by a heavily customized handset built for Android security – but seem to be built to spy on passing cellphone users, according to Popular Science.

Google dorks – FBI warning about dangerous ‘new’ search tool

The FBI has issued a warning to police and other emergency response personnel about a lethal new tool which ‘malicious actors’ have been using to deadly effect against American government institutions – Google dorks.

Data breach in South Korea hits 27 million – half the population

A data breach of staggering proportions has hit South Korea – involving 27 million people and 220 million private records – all bought from hackers with the goal of stealing money from online games.

Surveillance fears over systems which ‘follow’ cellphone users

Concern is growing over the export of surveillance equipment which can track the movements of anyone carrying a cellphone. Such technnologies are freely on sale not only to oppressive regimes, but also to criminal gangs.

Online fraud – POS malware has now hit 1,000 U.S. firms

More than a thousand U.S. businesses have been affected by point-of-sale malware – malicious software written specifically for online fraud, to steal information such as credit card details from businesses and their customers.

Google Images hacked? Searches fill with morbid image

An image of a Russian car crash has piled up in Google Images – leading to speculation that the service has been hacked. What’s less clear is why, or who might have done it.

PSN hacked – Network back after cyber attack and bomb threat

Sony’s PlayStation Network was back online and the information of its 53 million users safe, despite a weekend-long cyber attack, and a reported bomb threat which caused the diversion of a flight carrying a Sony executive.

Bitcoin wallet phishing scores unlikely hit with crypto-curious

A new tactic where waves of Bitcoin wallet phishing emails are targeted at corporations has proved a success for the criminals behind it – with nearly 2.7% of victims clicking on the malicious link embedded in the two waves of 12,000 emails.

Week in security: Nuclear attack, scareware back and traffic-light hack

This week saw two of the scariest targets for hacks ever – nuclear plants and city-wide traffic systems. Tthe traffic-light hack could basically have paralyzedany one of 40 American cities, and America’s Nuclear Regulatory Commission was successfully attacked three times within the past three years.

Facebook scams – the ‘classics’ and how to avoid them

But some things on Facebook haven’t changed – namely, the scams. It’s not that cybercriminals are unoriginal – it’s just that there are a few Facebook scams which work again and again. Here’s why.

Scareware: It’s back, and now it’s even scarier

‘Scareware’ – fake antivirus programs which attempt to fool the user into downloading malware, by warning him or her of a “threat” on their PC – is back, with a new, even more annoying trick.

Flight MH370 – did cyber attack steal its secret?

Classified documents relating to the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 were stolen using a carefully-crafted spear-phishing attack, targeting 30 government officials just one day after it vanished.

Traffic light – ‘easy’ to hack whole city’s systems

The most famous traffic light ‘hack’ in history is in the classic film, The Italian Job (1969), where the heist involves paralyzing Turin via its traffic control system – but the reality is much easier.

PIN number: Police want codes on ALL devices

Police hope to work with leading mobile phone manufacturers such as Samsung to build in the requirement for a password or PIN number into ALL handsets to ‘target-harden’ devices.

Banking security – new apps ‘know’ your touch

Everyone hates passwords – even the guy who invented them – but some bank app users in the Nordic region are experiencing a taste of a future where they might not be necessary.

Phishing emails: U.S. nuke authority hit three times

America’s Nuclear Regulatory Commission was successfully attacked three times within the past hree years, by unknown attackers, some foreign – and largely using standard phishing emails.

Twitter hacked – Cricket legend ‘Beefy’ Botham exposed

One of England’s greatest-ever cricketers, Sir Ian Botham, appeared to have been the victim of a Twitter hack yesterday as an obscene picture unexpectedly appeared on the sportsman’s feed.

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