Author
David Harley
David Harley
Senior Research Fellow

Education? Academic background in modern languages, social sciences, and computer science. A Fellow of the BCS Institute (formerly the British Computing Society), Chartered IT Professional, Certified Information Security Systems Professional, BS7799/ISO27001 Lead Auditor.

Highlights of your career? Office administration, programming, and IT support at Royal Free Hospital, then with Human Genome Project. System administration and support, then security analyst at Imperial Cancer Research Fund (now Cancer Research UK). Wrote/co-wrote/edited a number of Internet FAQs and my first articles on programming, security etc. I presented my first conference papers in 1997 (at Virus Bulletin and SANS), and soon after inherited the Mac Virus web site, which I still run as an independent security information resource. In 2001 I joined the UK’s National Health Service, where I ran the Threat Assessment Centre until 2006, acquired qualifications in computer security, security audit, and service management (ITIL), and was the go-to person nationally for issues related to malware. Viruses Revealed, published the same year by Osborne, wasn’t my first security book (I’ve written or contributed to about a dozen) but it was the first to make a real impact and was published in 2001: that, and the AVIEN Malware Defense Guide (Syngress), to which Andrew Lee also contributed, are probably the best known of my books.

Position and history at ESET? Senior Research Fellow at ESET N. America. I’ve worked with ESET since 2006, primarily as an author and blogger, editor, conference speaker, and commentator on a wide range of security issues. Essentially, they put up with me because I’ve been around so long.

What malware do you hate the most? Malware is just code. It’s malicious people I detest. While I’ve no love of the gangs behind phishing scams and banking Trojans, fake AV, 419s, support scams and so on, I can see that it’s easier to be honest in a relatively prosperous environment, if there is such a thing anymore, and that cybercrime can be driven by an economic imperative. But I have nothing but contempt for those sociopaths who cause harm to others for no reason except that they can.

Favorite activities? The guitar (I still play semi-professionally when time allows), songwriting, recording, listening to other people’s music. I love opera but don’t attempt to sing it. Photography, art, poetry, country walking – well, ambling is about as much as I can manage at my age – good food and wine, good television when I can find it...

What is your golden rule for cyberspace? Scepticism is a survival trait: don’t assume that anything you read online is gospel truth. Even this adage.

When did you get your first computer and what kind was it? Amstrad PCW in 1986. It ran a version of CP/M and came with an integral printer, word-processing software and versions of BASIC and Logo. I moved on to an 8086 when I got my first job in IT. What else would you expect a not-very-rich author to buy in 1986? :)

Favorite computer game/activity? Extra-curricular writing (blogging, verse, articles). Artwork and digital photography.

More Info

Tech Support Scammers: Talking to a Real Support Team

It so happens that I live over 5,000 miles from the ESET North America office in San Diego, and so tend not to have water cooler conversations with the people located there. Of course, researchers working for and with ESET around the world maintain contact through the wonders of electronic messaging, but there are lots

Tech support scam update: still flourishing, still evolving

[Update 30th October 2013: with regard to the ping gambit discussed below, please note that protection.com now responds to ICMP echo requests - in other words, if you now run the command "ping protection.com" you should now see a screen something like this: Note that this is perfectly normal behaviour for a site that responds

Why Mac security product testing is harder than you think

As both Macs and Mac malware increase in prevalence, the importance of testing the software intended to supplement the internal security of OS X increases too. But testing security products on Mac is tricky, due to Apple’s own countermeasures. Can it be made easier?

Comment/No Comment: a word about blog comments

After taking quite a long break from comment moderation on the WeLiveSecurity blog, I’ve recently started receiving comment notifications and have therefore been able to moderate some of the comments that have I’ve seen, and I thought it was worth passing on some thoughts about the moderation process as I see it. I should make

Catch me if you can: Can we predict who will fall for phishing emails?

A new paper aims to profile the victims most likely to fall for a phishing attack. But what is less clear is how you develop a profile while avoiding the pitfalls of stereotyping.

Whiter-than-white hats, malware, penalty and repentance*

I was recently contacted by a journalist researching a story about ‘hackers’ quitting the dark side (and virus writing in particular) for the bright(-er) side. He cited this set of examples – 7 Hackers Who Got Legit Jobs From Their Exploits – and also mentioned Mike Ellison (formerly known as Stormbringer and Black Wolf, among

My Back Pages* – Virus Bulletin papers and articles

I recently completed my 14th Virus Bulletin conference paper, co-written with Intego’s Lysa Myers, on “Mac hacking: the way to better testing?” to be presented at the 23rd VB conference in October, in Berlin. The paper itself won’t be available until after the conference, but the abstract is on the Virus Bulletin conference page here.

The London Scam and the Londonderry Air

My colleagues at ESET Ireland, report that an all-too-familiar scam is currently hitting Irish mailboxes. I’ve talked about it at some length here previously – for instance here and here – but here’s a quick summary. Someone, apparently someone you know (a friend or a family member) contacts you to tell you that they’ve been

Darkleech and the Android Master Key: making a hash of it

I made a comment recently that was subsequently quoted in a recent ESET blog – Android “master key” leaves 900 million devices vulnerable, researchers claim – and it appears that comment may have confused one or two people. What I actually said was this: “Security based on application whitelisting relies on an accurate identification of

The Fresh Prince of Bel-Where? – Academic Publishing Scams

[A shorter version of this article was originally published - without illustrations - on the Anti-Phishing Working Group’s eCrime blog.] Phishing attacks targeting academia aren’t the most high-profile of attacks, though they’re more common than you might think. Student populations in themselves constitute a sizeable pool of potential victims for money mule recruitment and other

Social Engineering, Management, and Security

A BYOD dissonance between economic imperative and loss of central control? Discontented staff susceptible to social engineering? David Harley reflects on aspects of Business Reimagined, a new book by Dave Coplin, chief envisioning officer at Microsoft UK, interivewed by Ross McGuinness in Metro.

Support Scams: we don’t really write all the viruses…

…and nor are we responsible for fake AV/scareware and (more recently) ransomware, though I did suggest in a paper I presented at EICAR a couple of years ago that the bad guys who do peddle that stuff are all too proficient at stealing our clothes, and that maybe some security companies were making it easier

Intellectual property protection and good badware

As an earlier article here noted, the recent report from the Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property shows a great deal of concern about the “scale of international theft of American intellectual property” which it estimates to be “hundreds of billions of dollars per year.” However, there’s also been a certain amount of

Phishing: the click of death

Recently we realized that from time to time when people find a live link in one of our blogs, they click on it to see where it goes, even though the context might suggest that the link could be malicious. So we thought it might be a good idea to set up a link so

Support scam cold-calling: the next generation

Stop me if you’ve heard this before… While I was in London recently for the InfoSec exhibition and some other meetings, my wife received a call from a lady with a heavy Indian accent, who told her that she had errors on her computer caused by viruses, and offering to remove them for her. For a fee, of course…

Job Scams: Nice Work If You Can Get It

The new ESET blog format must be striking a real chord with people. At any rate, job offers are just pouring in. Except that they don’t seem to be jobs for security bloggers, or for web developers like the team that maintains this site.

Win32/Cridex: Java pushes Cyprus into a Blackhole

Banking crisis in Cyprus is now being used in a spam campaign promoting the Blackhole exploit kit and the Win32/Cridex Trojan.

Phishbait: not so much a Smile as a rictus

Below, you can see the textual part of a bank phishing email I received today (it also contained a Smile logo, which was the only graphical content).  Here’s the message text from the phishing email:  Dear Account Holder, Do you know that with Smile Internet banking, you can eliminate the cost of receiving and transferring

Hundreds of thousands of Facebook likes can certainly be wrong

Issues with malware are always with us. There may or may not be a current media storm, or companies hoping for a slice of the anti-malware pie by proclaiming the death of antivirus in a press release, but AV labs continue to slog their way every day through tens of thousands of potentially malicious samples.

Scam conference invites: a tale of several cities

An invite to a conference in California proves to be a scam, and a very similar spam claims the very same conference is taking place in New York in March.

Follow Us

Automatically receive new posts via email:

Delivered by FeedBurner

ESET Virus Radar

Archives

Select month
Copyright © 2014 ESET, All Rights Reserved.