archives
July 2014

Tor ‘unmasked’ – but who is at risk?

Users of the online privacy service Tor – designed to allow users to access hidden sites anonymously – may have been unmasked after an attack lasting five months, crafted to de-anonymise traffic on the service.

Malware: Every USB port is “defenseless” against new scam

The billions of USB ports in use in PCs are vulnerable to a new attack – which can undetectably install malware, steal data and seize control of machines.

Facebook privacy – the 20,000 who just logged out (and why)

Set up in the wake of Facebook’s controversial ‘experiment’, the 99 Days project aims to work out a more profound question: does the site make us happy?

Internet of things – tests show almost all devices “riddled” with flaws

A new report found hundreds of serious security flaws in some of the most popular Internet of Things gadgets – the problem is far deeper than thought, with 70% of the most popular such gadgets having serious security flaws.

Android security flaw gives bad apps super-powers

A new Android flaw potentially affecting up to 80% of users could leave handsets vulnerable to rogue apps – leapfrogging the defenses used to ensure malicious developers are kept out.

Windows XP Doomed – hackers play classic shooter on ATM

For computer hackers, making the classic first-person shooter Doom play on odd devices is a quest that never ends – but an Australian team may have won the game for good, by running Doom on an ATM.

Microsoft denies it has ever been asked to plant a snooping backdoor into its products

If intelligence and law enforcement agencies have a genuine need to spy upon some communications then it should not be via a backdoor that could put millions of innocent, law-abiding users at risk.

Identity fraud: How one email wiped out $300m – and sender walked free

A single email wiped $300 million off the value of an Australian mining company, after an environmental activist, Jonathan Moylan and sent a press release to media organizations.

Sony hacked: Victims to get $15m in ‘quality’ games – some day

Victims of the notorious attack against Sony’s online gaming service and associated websites in 2011, which exposed details for up to 77 million subscribers, are to be offered $15m in digital goods as compensation.

Cloud security – fears as zombie army finds gold in heavens

Using free cloud application hosting can allow an attacker to create a “free supercomputer” according to The Register’s report – used to mine cryptocurrency, researcher Oscar Salazar warns.

Data breach – European bank’s info “held to ransom”

The European Central Bank has revealed that information including email addresses and contact data has leaked in a data breach – and that the unknown attackers demanded “financial compensation” from the bank in return for not releasing the information, according to the BBC’s report.

Accounts hacked: Stubhub $1m cyber fraud ticket scam busted

Ebay’s online ticket resale service Stubhub fell victim to a cyber-scam where a “global gang” used 1,600 hacked accounts on the service and bought and resold tickets, laundering $1m through European banks.

Online privacy fears as Tor rushes to fix “uncloaking” bug

The developers of the Tor online privacy service are fixing a weakness which could have exposed the identities of hundreds of thousands of users of sites around the world.

World of Warcraft account hacked – should thieves face jail?

Account hackers and thieves who loot magic weapons, armor and hard-won game currency from players in massively multiplayer titles such as World of Warcraft should face the same sentences as real-world thieves, a politician has suggested.

Tesla Model S hacked to open doors while in motion

Tesla’s Model S has been hacked to make the doors and sun roof open while the car is in motion – and the researchers behind the attack were able to control the systems remotely.

Shaggy Dogma: Passwords and Social Over-Engineering

Given the ‘nightmare’ that is password management, is Microsoft right to say that it’s sometimes OK to re-use the same memorable password on several sites?

Is your Point of Sale machine protected against attacks?

Criminals are very interested in retailers’ Point of Sale (PoS) machines. Recently, a new type of malware has been found that specifically tries to break into PoS machines, called Win32/BrutPOS.A.

Wi-Fi security – the new ‘bulletproof’ router (and how to toughen yours)

A new project aims to protect homes and small businesses from the security failings of Wi-Fi routers, a problem which has repeatedly hit the headlines over the past year.

Android/Simplocker using FBI child-abuse warnings to scare victims into paying $300

Last time we wrote about Android/Simplocker – the first ransomware for Android that actually encrypts user files – we discussed different variants of the malware and various distribution vectors that we’ve observed. Android/Simplocker has proven to be an actual threat in-the-wild in spite of its weaknesses…

Comic-Con 2014: Eight super-powered digital safety tips

Over the past few years, Comic-Con has had over 130,000 attendees, and those attendees tend to be very digitally literate – so that means we will probably see double that number of connected devices – laptops, tablets, smartphones and perhaps even tricorders.

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31 Jul 2014
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