archives
November 2013

When malware goes bad: an historical sampler

A look back at malware failures, malicious code that did not work out as well as the folks behind it had hoped. Can malware spread to quickly for its own good? Can malware authors ever test their wares well enough to work perfectly?

Cash – or crash? Tips and tricks for using Bitcoin safely

Despite the heists against Bitcoin sites, plus high-profile law-enforcement actions against ‘dark market’ sites such as Silk Road, which conducted transactions in Bitcoin, the currency is soaring. We asked ESET experts, and finance advisors, for tips on how to stay safe.

Kickstarter, Urbanspoon and Warner Bros among 2,000 sites at risk from “impersonators”

Major websites such as Kickstarter, WarnerBros.com and the online photography community 500px.com are among 2,000 at risk from a vulnerability that could allow attackers to impersonate real users and access their sites, according to a researcher.

YouTube comment channels now even angrier after ‘forced marriage’ to Google Plus

YouTube comments channels are widely known as a toxic and hostile environment – but Google has admitted that YouTube’s recent integration with Google Plus has made things even worse.

Filecoder epidemic goes global as Australians among “millions” of victims worldwide

Filecoder, an unpleasant and virulent strain of ransomware is now spreading globally, with experts estimating that the gang behind it must be earning “millions”. The surging value of Bitcoin may be helping the criminals, experts say.

How do we protect kids from online predators?

The Internet is a vast source of information for all of us, and naturally some people use that information for good, and some for ill, like grooming and stalking children. So what things can you as a parent, teacher, or other concerned adult do to protect kids against online predators and solicitation?

Most big businesses “still failing” to recognize cyber risks, survey finds

The survey found that just 14% of top firms even took cyber risks into account at board level, according to a survey from the UK’s Department for Business, Innovation & Skills. Only a quarter see cybersecurity as a top priority.

European Parliament switches off Wi-Fi after hacker breaks into politicians’ emails

The European Parliament has switched off its public Wi-Fi system after an anonymous hacker broke into the personal emails of several Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) from outside the building, using only a laptop.

Phish to phry: The Thoughtful Phisher Revisited…

[A much shorter version of this article appeared in the October 2013 Threat Radar Report as 'The Thoughtful Phisher'. As these particular scam/spam campaigns don’t seem to be diminishing, however – indeed, some of the phishing techniques seem to be getting more sophisticated – I thought perhaps it was worth updating and expanding for a

Bitcoin heist nets cybercriminals $1 million after huge DDoS “smokescreen”

A large-scale “heist” targeting Bitcoin site BIPS led to the theft of $1 million in Bitcoin – the second such major attack this month. BIPS was blasted with a massive DDoS attack two days before the theft on November 15.

The beat goes on: Heartbeat-sensing bracelet Nymi could kill off “PINs, passwords, keys and cards”

Human heartbeats are near-unique – each person’s rhythm forms a mathematical pattern which can be used to identify people. A bracelet which aims to use this for secure ID took a big step towards PCs and phones in the home this week, as 6,000 developers began work on apps for it.

Popular horse-racing site hit by “aggressive” cyber attack – passwords leaked

A major British horse racing website has been hit by an “aggressive” and “malicious” cyber attack – and user details have leaked, including some passwords which the owners warn “could be deciphered.”

Twitter ramps up security for users – says its approach should be “the new normal”

Twitter has unveiled a serious security upgrade to protect its users’ data from cyber-snooping – and has said that this approach should be “the new normal for web service owners.”

‘High impact’ bug found in Gmail password recovery system

A ‘high impact’ security bug affecting Gmail’s password recovery system was discovered by a researcher – and quickly patched. The vulnerability allowed attackers to reset user passwords remotely.

Tech Support Scammers: Talking to a Real Support Team

It so happens that I live over 5,000 miles from the ESET North America office in San Diego, and so tend not to have water cooler conversations with the people located there. Of course, researchers working for and with ESET around the world maintain contact through the wonders of electronic messaging, but there are lots

LG admits that its ‘Smart TVs’ have been watching users – and transmitting data without consent

Some LG ‘Smart TVs’ watch their owners – logging their viewing habits without their permission – and transmitting the information back to the company, LG has admitted. The TVs do this even if the user has specifically selected an option not to share data.

PC gaming service fined $1m for serving up Bitcoin-mining malware

The company, E-Sports Entertainment, served up malware which used PCs to mine Bitcoins, an attack which earned $3,602. The malware was delivered surreptitiously alongside the company’s official client.

What becomes of the broken hearted? Dating website leaked 42 million usernames and passwords

Dating site Cupid Media left personal details and plain text passwords for 42 million users exposed after an attack earlier this year. The details included names, emails and birthdays for users of the dating service, according to reporter Brian Krebs.

Graham Cluley: AV shouldn’t just be something on your hard drive – it should be part of a global immune system

In the first of a series of guest blog posts AV industry veteran Graham Cluley voices his opinion on how security has changed – and the changes we all need to make for the future.

Does your mouse know it’s you? Researchers claim patterns can “fingerprint” users – and lock out imposters

When any computer user types on a keyboard, the pattern of keystrokes is unique – like a fingerprint. When using a mouse, the patterns for each user are just as different – and Iowa State engineers aim to combine these “patterns” to identify people, offering a more secure alternative to passwords.

Follow Us

Automatically receive new posts via email:

Delivered by FeedBurner

20 articles related to:
Hot Topic
ESET Virus Radar

Archives

Select month
Copyright © 2014 ESET, All Rights Reserved.