archives
January 2011

You Have the Right to Remain Silent, but You Won’t

Did you know that what you post on Facebook can be used as evidence in a court of law? At least that is the case in the US. Ironically I found the story on an Australian web site :) The story at http://www.itnews.com.au/News/246329,facebook-posts-mined-for-court-case-evidence.aspx is well worth reading. It is not only your public messages than

Microsoft Security Advisory (2501696)

There is a new vulnerability that affects all supported versions of Windows and some unsupported versions. For you techies the “Vulnerability in MHTML Could Allow Information Disclosure” advisory is at https://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/advisory/2501696.mspx. If you are not a techie you might want to take a look and see how much you can understand. By reading the security

The Hidden Face of Facebook Security

Facebook actually does have some exceptionally talented security professionals. They have almost no depth in privacy, but they have real security talent. A part of the problem is that the Facebook culture is anti-security and that is a very tough obstacle for their security professionals. Facebook security is by marketing design. Take a look at

Inside a phishing attack: 35 credit cards in 5 hours

Phishing attacks have grown steadily in recent years, becoming a highly profitable attack for cyber criminals. In ESET Latin America’s Laboratory, we are used to finding and informing about phishing attack outbreaks in our region. A few days ago, we found a new case of phishing, for which we investigated the effectiveness of the attack.

AMTSO members meeting

The next AMTSO members meeting is getting pretty close… It's being held in San Mateo on the 10th and 11th February. More information, including the preliminary agenda, on the AMTSO meetings page. David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP ESET Senior Research Fellow

Stuxnet Information and Resources (3)

This is the 3rd volume of an ongoing Stuxnet resources blog article, supplementing our paper “Stuxnet Under the Microscope”. Volume 1 is at http://blog.eset.com/?p=5731, and volume 2 is at http://blog.eset.com/?p=5913.

The Sound of a Credit Card

A recent article at http://www.thinq.co.uk/2011/1/20/android-trojan-captures-credit-card-details/#ixzz1Bb8RGsWS describes how an attack against Android based phones might be able to capture your credit card information even when you speak it into the phone. The interesting thing about this proof of concept is not that the application can capture voice details, but rather that it uses a second application

X Rated

No, this is not about porn, but rather about Adobe. The newest version of Adobe’s PDF reader is called Adobe X. If you are like me, your copy of Adobe Reader (or Adobe Acrobat) did not automatically upgrade to the newest version. Adobe X incorporates a sandboxing technology to try to help mitigate the numerous

Why do phishing attacks work better on mobile phones?

During my regular reading on the main feeds on information security this week, I found a small and particular news that, I consider, invites us to think about it. It turns out that according to a post by Mickey Boodaei, CEO of Trusteer, mobile phones users are three times more likely to become victims of

Phone Scams and Panic Attacks

…many scams work by panicking victims into taking some unwise action, whether it’s parting with their credit card details or opening a malicious program, claiming that some problem or illegal action is associated with their computer or IP address, such as transmitting malware or visiting paedophile or other pornographic sites…

Stuxnet Information and Resources (2)

[Update 23rd January 2011: volume 3 of this resource has just kicked off at /2011/01/23/stuxnet-information-and-resources-3/: volume 1 is at /2011/01/03/stuxnet-information-and-resources/.] @imaguid microblogged today about his annoyance at "the analysts and journalists who breathlessly fawn over #stuxnet", and suggested that we call it even. I hope he won't think I'm fawning by maintaining resource lists in

Sandboxie and Adobe X (and ESET too)

I recently upgraded my copy of Adobe Reader to Adobe Reader X, the new version that sandboxes the PDF reader. I immediately had problems with PDFs that I tried to open from the internet. I uninstalled Reader X and reinstalled to no avail. I suspected that there might be an issue between Sandboxie and Reader

Stuxnet updates #umpteen

Added to the Stuxnet resources article 19th January 2011…

More Stuxnet Fallout

Added to the Stuxnet resources page today … something of a second wave of commentary that’s a little more cautious about accepting the NYT’s conclusions.

Stuxnet, cyberwar, cybersabotage, blah…

While most of the recent media interest in Stuxnet has centred on the New York Times story, there’s been some thoughtful research published that considers it as just one aspect of larger issues: cyberwarfare, cyberespionage, cybersabotage and so on.

Stuxnet: the Never-Ending Story

…The NYT article strikes me as being well-researched, well-written, and well worth reading, and the involvement of Dimona is more plausible than much of the speculation I’ve seen, but it’s still hard to distinguish hard fact from sheer guesswork…

Stuxnet and Iran

…today’s New York Times article “Israel Tests on Worm Called Crucial in Iran Nuclear Delay” … is a notable addition to the information and commentary on this aspect of the Stuxnet phenomenon…

Encrypted Facebook Chat?

With the release of Firesheep the Firefox add on HTTPS Everywhere has increased in popularity as it helps ensure that your Facebook session is encrypted. Using Facebook over https breaks the chat on Facebook however. The other day a friend of mine initiated a chat with me on Facebook. Imagine my surprise since I was

Adobe Flash, The Spy in Your Computer – Part 5

I didn’t expect a part 5, but here it is! Adobe has announced that they will be making some significant changes to Flash. In a blog post http://blogs.adobe.com/flashplatform/2011/01/on-improving-privacy-managing-local-storage-in-flash-player.html Adobe’s marketing machine really pours it on thick, but there appears to be some good news. In the blog it is stat4ed that a future release of

Check your Facebook Account

Facebook is rolling out a new look for user profiles. Facebook started making its new profile optional last month, but is now forcing the new format on all users. At least one security expert I know indicated that his privacy settings were not maintained when his account was switched to the new format. On Facebook

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28 Jan 2011
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