archives
November 2009

Hacker tool exploits vulnerability in jailbroken iPhones

I don't really want to keep banging on about jailbroken iPhones when there are threats out there that affect many more people (though according to Intego, 6-8% of iPhones are, in fact, jailbroken, so I don't want to minimize the threat either). I'm quoting Intego because they've just blogged (http://blog.intego.com/2009/11/11/intego-security-memo-hacker-tool-copies-personal-info-from-iphones/) what I think is a

ikee iPhone iWorm iSource: iYukkkkk!!!!

Inevitably, the source code for the ikee worm I mentioned in a previous blog (http://www.eset.com/threat-center/blog/2009/11/10/iworm-ikee-sex-and-drugs-and-rick-and-roll) has crept back out from under its rock. It's probably equally inevitable that there'll be more script-kiddy attempts to produce variants and it will be easier for heavy-duty malware creators to produce new malware using similar techniques, if they're so-minded. If you

ThreatSense.Net: Fear and Loathing in the UK

I was asked about malware infection in the UK (especially with reference to Conficker), and(a) if the situation is really as bad as we, the AV vendors make out, and what the real infection rate is; and (b) whether government and ISPs etc could do more to help. You can now find a link here

iWorm ikee: Sex and Drugs and Rick and Roll

The iPhone, it seems, is under siege: a recent worm exploits a known (and previously exploited) vulnerability that affects the owners of "jailbroken" phones on which OpenSSH has been installed. (Jailbreaking allows iPhone users to install and use unapproved applications.) Of course, there's been an enormous amount of media coverage on this already (I've just

The Blame Game

I recently learned a new acronym: SODDI (Some Other Dude Did It). What this refers to is the defense that criminals routinely use (plausible deniability) – and even more so when it comes to illicit activities on the Internet. On Sunday, November 8th 2009 the Associated Press published an article regarding an individual that was

Tamper-Proof Anti-Malware

As I already mentioned briefly in a blog about our October Threat Trends Report, researchers Christopher and Samir came up with an interesting idea at the First International Workshop on Aggressive Alternative Computing and Security, held under the auspices of ESIEA Laval (École Supérieure d'Informatique, Electronique et Automatique). They took a handful of scanners (including NOD32),

October Global Threat Report

As usual, ESET has released its monthly Global Threat Trends Report, which will be available in due course at http://www.eset.com/threat-center/index.php. There are no surprises in the top five malicious programs, which have the same rankings as in the September report. Clearly, not enough people are taking our accumulated advice on reducing the risk from Conficker,

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