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January 2009

Protection Part 7

If sensitive information is stored on your hard drive (and if you don’t have -something- worth protecting on your system, you’re probably not reading this blog…), protect it with encryption. Furthermore, when you copy or move data elsewhere, it’s usually at least as important to protect/encrypt it when it’s on removable media, or transferred electronically.

Twitter Security: Tweetie Pie Panic

[Update info moved to new blog post on 6th January] In deference to all those old enough to get a panic attack when reminded of how bad pop music was capable of being in the 1970s, I’ll try to overcome by the urge to mention "Chirpy Chirpy Tweet Tweet". Anyway, to business. Having all the

Digital Photo Frames and the Autorun Problem

Speaking of SANS, the Internet Storm Center has more than once talked about problems with digital photo frames, and at Xmas did so again with reference to the well-publicised Samsung incident. The San Francisco Chronicle came up with a story a couple of days ago that was even more alarming, and not only in the volume

10 Ways to Protect Yourself: Part 6

Don’t disclose sensitive information on public websites like FaceBook or LinkedIn. Even information that in itself is innocuous can be combined with other harmless information and used in social engineering attacks. Rather than expand on that point, for now, I’m going to point to another "10 ways to protect yourself" resource: the more good advice

10 Ways to Protect Yourself: Part 5

Don’t trust unsolicited files or embedded links, even from friends. It’s easy to spoof email addresses, for instance, so that email appears to come from someone other than the real sender (who/which may in any case be a spam tool rather than a human being). Basic SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) doesn’t validate the sender’s

It’s Scam Time!!!

Welcome to prime-time scam season. This is when the advertisements for taxes in the USA really start to pick up. Granted, they go on all year long, but now is when we traditionally see an increase in volume. There are a variety of such scams. The worst of the scams are the phishing attacks. If

10 Ways to Protect Yourself: Part 4

Use different passwords for your computer and on-line services. Also, it’s good practice to change passwords on a regular basis and avoid simple passwords, especially those that are easily guessed. As Randy pointed out in a recent blog, it’s debatable whether enforced frequent changes of hard-to-remember passwords are always constructive (they can force the user to write down

Ten Ways to Protect Yourself: Part 3

Log on to your computer with an account that doesn’t have “Administrator” privileges, to reduce the likelihood and severity of damage from self-installing malware. Multi-user operating systems (and nowadays, few operating systems assume that a machine will be used by a single user at a single level of privilege) allow you to create an account

Castlecops: more comments

Further to my post of 25th December about the withdrawal of the CastleCops services, there’s a blog at Darkreading that includes more information, including some quotes from Paul Laudanski, who was, with his wife Robin, the driving force behind the organization: also quotes from our own Randy Abrams, David Ulevitch of PhishTank, and Garth Bruen

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